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      Classifying attentional vulnerability to total sleep deprivation using baseline features of Psychomotor Vigilance Test performance

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          Abstract

          There are strong individual differences in performance during sleep deprivation. We assessed whether baseline features of Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) performance can be used for classifying participants’ relative attentional vulnerability to total sleep deprivation. In a laboratory, healthy adults (n = 160, aged 18–30 years) completed a 10-min PVT every 2 h while being kept awake for ≥24 hours. Participants were categorized as vulnerable (n = 40), intermediate (n = 80), or resilient (n = 40) based on their number of PVT lapses during one night of sleep deprivation. For each baseline PVT (taken 4–14 h after wake-up time), a linear discriminant model with wrapper-based feature selection was used to classify participants’ vulnerability to subsequent sleep deprivation. Across models, classification accuracy was about 70% (range 65–76%) using stratified 5-fold cross validation. The models provided about 78% sensitivity and 86% specificity for classifying resilient participants, and about 70% sensitivity and 89% specificity for classifying vulnerable participants. These results suggest features derived from a single 10-min PVT at baseline can provide substantial, but incomplete information about a person’s relative attentional vulnerability to total sleep deprivation. In the long term, modeling approaches that incorporate baseline performance characteristics can potentially improve personalized predictions of attentional performance when sleep deprivation cannot be avoided.

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          Most cited references 52

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          Wrappers for feature subset selection

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            Developing criteria for establishing interrater reliability of specific items: applications to assessment of adaptive behavior.

            A set of criteria based upon biostatistical considerations for determining the interrater reliability of specific adaptive behavior items in a given setting was presented. The advantages and limitations of extant statistical assessment procedures were discussed. Also, a set of guidelines for differentiating type of adaptive behavior that are statistically reliable from those that are reliable in a clinical or practical sense was delineated. Data sets were presented throughout in order to illustrate the advantages of recommended statistical procedures over other available ones.
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              Effect of reducing interns' weekly work hours on sleep and attentional failures.

              Knowledge of the physiological effects of extended (24 hours or more) work shifts in postgraduate medical training is limited. We aimed to quantify work hours, sleep, and attentional failures among first-year residents (postgraduate year 1) during a traditional rotation schedule that included extended work shifts and during an intervention schedule that limited scheduled work hours to 16 or fewer consecutive hours. Twenty interns were studied during two three-week rotations in intensive care units, each during both the traditional and the intervention schedule. Subjects completed daily sleep logs that were validated with regular weekly episodes (72 to 96 hours) of continuous polysomnography (r=0.94) and work logs that were validated by means of direct observation by study staff (r=0.98). Seventeen of 20 interns worked more than 80 hours per week during the traditional schedule (mean, 84.9; range, 74.2 to 92.1). All interns worked less than 80 hours per week during the intervention schedule (mean, 65.4; range, 57.6 to 76.3). On average, interns worked 19.5 hours per week less (P<0.001), slept 5.8 hours per week more (P<0.001), slept more in the 24 hours preceding each working hour (P<0.001), and had less than half the rate of attentional failures while working during on-call nights (P=0.02) on the intervention schedule as compared with the traditional schedule. Eliminating interns' extended work shifts in an intensive care unit significantly increased sleep and decreased attentional failures during night work hours. Copyright 2004 Massachusetts Medical Society.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                joshua.gooley@duke-nus.edu.sg
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                20 August 2019
                20 August 2019
                2019
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0385 0924, GRID grid.428397.3, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, , Duke-NUS Medical School, ; Singapore, 169857 Singapore
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0385 0924, GRID grid.428397.3, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, , Duke-NUS Medical School, ; Singapore, 169857 Singapore
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0378 8294, GRID grid.62560.37, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, , Brigham and Women’s Hospital, ; Boston, MA 02115 USA
                [4 ]ISNI 000000041936754X, GRID grid.38142.3c, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, ; Boston, MA 02115 USA
                Article
                48280
                10.1038/s41598-019-48280-4
                6702200
                31431644
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100008898, National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI);
                Award ID: NASA NCC 9-58
                Award ID: NASA NCC 9-58
                Award ID: NASA NCC 9-58
                Award ID: NASA NCC 9-58
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100000002, U.S. Department of Health &amp; Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH);
                Award ID: NIMH R01 MH45130
                Award ID: NCCAM R01 AT002129
                Award ID: NHLBI K24HL105664
                Award ID: M01 RR02635
                Award ID: T32-HL07901
                Award ID: NIMH R01 MH45130
                Award ID: NCCAM R01 AT002129
                Award ID: NHLBI K24HL105664
                Award ID: M01 RR02635
                Award ID: T32-HL07901
                Award ID: NIMH R01 MH45130
                Award ID: NCCAM R01 AT002129
                Award ID: NHLBI K24HL105664
                Award ID: M01 RR02635
                Award ID: T32-HL07901
                Award ID: NIMH R01 MH45130
                Award ID: NCCAM R01 AT002129
                Award ID: NHLBI K24HL105664
                Award ID: M01 RR02635
                Award ID: T32-HL07901
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100000006, United States Department of Defense | United States Navy | Office of Naval Research (ONR);
                Award ID: N00014-15-1-2408
                Award ID: N00014-15-1-2408
                Award ID: N00014-15-1-2408
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100000185, United States Department of Defense | Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA);
                Award ID: N66001-13-C-4035
                Award ID: N66001-13-C-4035
                Award ID: N66001-13-C-4035
                Award ID: N66001-13-C-4035
                Award ID: N66001-13-C-4035
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Duke-NUS Signature Research Program funded by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, and the Ministry of Health, Singapore
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Uncategorized

                attention, sleep deprivation

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