Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

dbEST--database for "expressed sequence tags".

Nature genetics

Humans, Gene Expression, Databases, Factual, genetics, chemistry, DNA, Base Sequence, Animals

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 12

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Identification of protein coding regions by database similarity search.

      Sequence similarity between a translated nucleotide sequence and a known biological protein can provide strong evidence for the presence of a homologous coding region, even between distantly related genes. The computer program BLASTX performed conceptual translation of a nucleotide query sequence followed by a protein database search in one programmatic step. We characterized the sensitivity of BLASTX recognition to the presence of substitution, insertion and deletion errors in the query sequence and to sequence divergence. Reading frames were reliably identified in the presence of 1% query errors, a rate that is typical for primary sequence data. BLASTX is appropriate for use in moderate and large scale sequencing projects at the earliest opportunity, when the data are most prone to containing errors.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Large scale cDNA sequencing for analysis of quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

        Large scale sequencing of cDNAs provides a complementary approach to structural analysis of the human genome by generating expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We have initiated the large-scale sequencing of a 3'-directed cDNA library from the human liver cell line HepG2, that is a non-biased representation of the mRNA population. 982 random cDNA clones were sequenced yielding more than 270 kilobases. A significant portion of the identified genes encoded secretable proteins and components for protein-synthesis. The abundance of cDNA species varied from 2.2% to less than 0.004%. Fifty two percent of the mRNA were abundant species consisting of 173 genes and the rest were non-abundant, consisting of about 6,600 genes.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          3,400 new expressed sequence tags identify diversity of transcripts in human brain.

          We present the results of the partial sequencing of over 3,400 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from human brain cDNA clones, which increases the number of distinct genes expressed in the brain, that are represented by ESTs, to about 6,000. By choosing clones in an unbiased manner, it is possible to construct a profile of the transcriptional activity of the brain at different stages. Proteins that comprise the cytoskeleton are the most abundant; however, a large variety of regulatory proteins are also seen. About half of the ESTs predicted to contain a protein-coding region have no matches in the public peptide databases and may represent new gene families.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            10.1038/ng0893-332
            8401577

            Chemistry

            Humans, Gene Expression, Databases, Factual, genetics, chemistry, DNA, Base Sequence, Animals

            Comments

            Comment on this article