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      Effect of Dilazep Dihydrochloride on Urinary Albumin Excretion in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

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          Abstract

          Proteinuria and microalbuminuria occur with a highly variable severity and are associated with progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Dilazep dihydrochloride, an antiplatelet drug, is effective in patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy or diabetic nephropathy. We studied whether dilazep dihydrochloride affects the urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in normotensive and hypertensive patients with ADPKD. Twelve normotensive ADPKD patients with microalbuminuria were randomly assigned to two groups: a dilazep (300 mg/day) treatment group (n = 6, group A) and a placebo group (n = 6, group B). In addition, 10 hypertensive ADPKD patients with microalbuminuria were randomly assigned to two groups: a dilazep (300 mg/day) treatment group (n = 5, group C) and a placebo group (n = 5, group D). Treatment with dilazep was continued for a period of 6 months, at the end of which the UAE was reduced form 130 ± 52 to 46 ± 26 µg/min (p < 0.01) in group A. There was no reduction in group C. There were no changes in UAE in placebo groups B and D. These results suggest that dilazep dihydrochloride may be effective in reducing UAE in normotensive ADPKD patients with microalbuminuria.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Proteinuria as a Mediator of Tubulointerstitial Injury

          Proteinuria is one of the most potent risk factors for renal disease progression in patients with glomerular diseases. Studies in disease models have helped to delineate mechanisms leading to renal structural damage due to persistent dysfunction of the glomerular barrier to proteins, even when the primary immune or nonimmune insult to the kidney has ceased. The main focus of this review is the role of the tubular epithelial cell in the induction of interstitial inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions to ultrafiltered proteins. Antiproteinuric drugs (angiotensin–converting enzyme inhibitors, ACEi) while preserving the integrity of the glomerular permselective barrier limit both proteinuria and protein–dependent processes which contribute to tubulointerstitial injury, and in so doing ACEi halt the progression of proteinuric nephropathies toward terminal renal failure.
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            Effect of Dilazep Hydrochloride, an Antiplatelet Agent, on the Proliferation of Cultured Mouse Glomerular Mesangial Cells

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              Hypertension, Lipid Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Changes in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEF
                Nephron
                10.1159/issn.1660-8151
                Nephron
                S. Karger AG
                1660-8151
                2235-3186
                2001
                2001
                25 April 2001
                : 88
                : 1
                : 80-82
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Medicine, Misato Junshin Hospital, Misato, bMizue Kidney Center, Tokyo, and cDepartment of Medicine, Koto Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
                Article
                45963 Nephron 2001;88:80–82
                10.1159/000045963
                11340355
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 2, References: 17, Pages: 3
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/45963
                Categories
                Short Communication

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