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      Gene Expression Profiles of Vascular Smooth Muscle Show Differential Expression of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways during Captopril Therapy of Heart Failure

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          Abstract

          Congestive heart failure (CHF) is characterized by increased vascular tone and an impairment in nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilatation. We have demonstrated that the blunted response to nitric oxide is due, in part, to a reduction in the leucine-zipper-positive isoform of the myosin-targeting subunit (MYPT1) of myosin light-chain phosphatase. Additionally, we have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, but not afterload reduction with prazosin, preserves leucine-zipper-positive MYPT1 isoform expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and normalizes the sensitivity to cGMP-mediated vasodilatation. We therefore hypothesized that in CHF, growth regulators and cytokines downstream of the angiotensin II receptor are involved in modulating gene expression in vascular tissue. Rats were divided into control and captopril-treated groups following left coronary artery ligation. Gene expression profiles in the aorta and portal vein at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed using microarray technology and quantitative real-time PCR. After MI, microarray analysis revealed differential mRNA expression of 21 genes in the aorta of captopril-treated rats 2 and 4 weeks after surgery when compared to gene expression profiles at baseline and without captopril therapy. Real-time PCR demonstrated that captopril suppressed the expression of protein kinases in the angiotensin-II-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, including Taok1 and Raf1. These data suggest that in CHF, captopril therapy modulates gene expression in vascular smooth muscle, and some of the beneficial effects of ACE inhibition may be due to differential gene expression in the vasculature.

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          Most cited references 18

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          dbEST--database for "expressed sequence tags".

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            Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology.

             D Wheeler (2003)
            In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's Web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, PubMed, PubMed Central (PMC), LocusLink, the NCBITaxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR (e-PCR), Open Reading Frame (ORF) Finder, References Sequence (RefSeq), UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), Human/Mouse Homology Map, Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker (MM), Evidence Viewer (EV), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) database, Retroviral Genotyping Tools, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
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              Angiotensin II stimulates NADH and NADPH oxidase activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

              The signaling pathways involved in the long-term metabolic effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) in vascular smooth muscle cells are incompletely understood but include the generation of molecules likely to affect oxidase activity. We examined the ability of Ang II to stimulate superoxide anion formation and investigated the identity of the oxidases responsible for its production. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells with Ang II for 4 to 6 hours caused a 2.7 +/- 0.4-fold increase in intracellular superoxide anion formation as detected by lucigenin assay. This superoxide appeared to result from activation of both the NADPH and NADH oxidases. NADPH oxidase activity increased from 3.23 +/- 0.61 to 11.80 +/- 1.72 nmol O2-/min per milligram protein after 4 hours of Ang II, whereas NADH oxidase activity increased from 16.76 +/- 2.13 to 45.00 +/- 4.57 nmol O2-/min per milligram protein. The NADPH oxidase activity was stimulated by exogenous phosphatidic and arachidonic acids and was partially inhibited by the specific inhibitor diphenylene iodinium. NADH oxidase activity was increased by arachidonic and linoleic acids, was insensitive to exogenous phosphatidic acid, and was inhibited by high concentrations of quinacrine. Both of these oxidases appear to reside in the plasma membrane, on the basis of migration of the activity after cellular fractionation and their apparent insensitivity to the mitochondrial poison KCN. These observations suggest that Ang II specifically activates enzyme systems that promote superoxide generation and raise the possibility that these pathways function as second messengers for long-term responses, such as hypertrophy or hyperplasia.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                JVR
                J Vasc Res
                10.1159/issn.1018-1172
                Journal of Vascular Research
                S. Karger AG
                1018-1172
                1423-0135
                2008
                August 2008
                16 April 2008
                : 45
                : 5
                : 445-454
                Affiliations
                Cardiovascular Division, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minn., USA
                Article
                126735 J Vasc Res 2008;45:445–454
                10.1159/000126735
                18418003
                © 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 2, References: 28, Pages: 10
                Categories
                Research Paper

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