Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      AT WHAT COST? AN ANALYSIS OF THE GREEN COST PREMIUM TO ACHIEVE 6-HOMESTAR IN NEW ZEALAND

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          ABSTRACT

          In the green building industry there is an implicit understanding that the use of a green building rating tool will attract additional capital cost. This phenomenon has been well studied in commercial buildings, with mixed results, but has received little focus in the residential, single family context.

          In New Zealand the local green building council advises the market that they have reduced the time and cost to implement their green building rating tool, Homestar, through modifications to version 4 of the rating tool, which include the use of a new 6-Homestar checklist.

          This research investigates this claim using a comparative cost methodology to determine the potential additional capital cost commitment that would be required to achieve a 6-Homestar certification, utilising ten standalone and terraced house designs from the Hobsonville Point development in Auckland, NZ.

          This research determines that there is an additional cost to achieve 6-Homestar of 3–5%. This is nearly double compared to previous research into Homestar and also finds that, for the houses reviewed, the use of the 6-Homestar checklist is less cost effective than other options. Therefore, in this instance the advice and guidance of the green building council is erroneous and misleading to the market.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Effect of insulating existing houses on health inequality: cluster randomised study in the community.

          To determine whether insulating existing houses increases indoor temperatures and improves occupants' health and wellbeing. Community based, cluster, single blinded randomised study. Seven low income communities in New Zealand. 1350 households containing 4407 participants. Installation of a standard retrofit insulation package. Indoor temperature and relative humidity, energy consumption, self reported health, wheezing, days off school and work, visits to general practitioners, and admissions to hospital. Insulation was associated with a small increase in bedroom temperatures during the winter (0.5 degrees C) and decreased relative humidity (-2.3%), despite energy consumption in insulated houses being 81% of that in uninsulated houses. Bedroom temperatures were below 10 degrees C for 1.7 fewer hours each day in insulated homes than in uninsulated ones. These changes were associated with reduced odds in the insulated homes of fair or poor self rated health (adjusted odds ratio 0.50, 95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.68), self reports of wheezing in the past three months (0.57, 0.47 to 0.70), self reports of children taking a day off school (0.49, 0.31 to 0.80), and self reports of adults taking a day off work (0.62, 0.46 to 0.83). Visits to general practitioners were less often reported by occupants of insulated homes (0.73, 0.62 to 0.87). Hospital admissions for respiratory conditions were also reduced (0.53, 0.22 to 1.29), but this reduction was not statistically significant (P=0.16). Insulating existing houses led to a significantly warmer, drier indoor environment and resulted in improved self rated health, self reported wheezing, days off school and work, and visits to general practitioners as well as a trend for fewer hospital admissions for respiratory conditions.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Overcoming the Social and Psychological Barriers to Green Building

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1943-4618
                1552-6100
                Spring 2020
                14 July 2020
                : 15
                : 2
                : 131-155
                Author notes

                1. University of Auckland Business School, Department of Property, Auckland, New Zealand, chelleade@ 123456yahoo.com; m.rehm@ 123456auckland.ac.nz

                Article
                jgb.15.2.131
                10.3992/1943-4618.15.2.131

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 25
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

                Comments

                Comment on this article