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      Uncoupling sweet taste and calories: Comparison of the effects of glucose and three intense sweeteners on hunger and food intake

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      Physiology & Behavior

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 7

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          Paradoxical effects of an intense sweetener (aspartame) on appetite.

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            Caloric regulation in normal-weight men maintained on a palatable diet of conventional foods.

            The spontaneous food intake of six normal-weight male volunteers was measured for 24 days while the subjects were inpatients on a metabolic unit. They were fed a palatable diet of conventional foods and were kept unaware that their food intake was being measured. On days 7-18 the caloric content of their diet was covertly reduced by 25% by substituting aspartame-sweetened analogues for all menu items containing sucrose. Subjects did not alter their food intake for 3 days. Then between days 4-6 on the aspartame diet, they increased their intake to compensate for 40% of the missing calories. Food intake stabilized at 85% of baseline and remained the same for the rest of the 12-day dilution period. Subjects did not show a shift in either sweetened or unsweetened food choices while their diet was being diluted. In adjusting for the missing calories, they simply ate more of their customary diet. The replacement of sucrose by aspartame tended to curb the weight gain observed on the baseline diet.
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              Artificial sweetener use and one-year weight change among women.

              Weight change over a 1-year period was examined in a highly homogeneous group of 78,694 women ages 50-69 enrolled in a prospective mortality study. Artificial sweetener usage increased with relative weight and decreased with age. Users were significantly more likely than nonusers to gain weight, regardless of initial weight. Average weight gains or losses by artificial sweetener users differed by less than 2 pounds from gains or losses among nonusers. These results were not explicable by differences in food consumption patterns. The data do not support the hypothesis that long-term artificial sweetener use either helps weight loss or prevents weight gain.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Physiology & Behavior
                Physiology & Behavior
                Elsevier BV
                00319384
                January 1988
                January 1988
                : 43
                : 5
                : 547-552
                Article
                10.1016/0031-9384(88)90207-7
                © 1988

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