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      Efficacy of Oral Hydration in the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography or Intervention

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          Abstract

          Background: Efficacy of intravenous (IV) volume expansion in preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is well known. However, the role of oral hydration has not been well established. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of oral hydration in preventing CI-AKI. Methods: We prospectively randomized 225 patients undergoing coronary angiography and/or percutaneous coronary intervention in either oral hydration or IV hydration groups. Patients who have at least one of the high-risk factors for developing CI-AKI (advanced age, type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, hyperuricemia, a history of cardiac failure or systolic dysfunction) were included in the study. All patients had normal renal function or stage 1-2 chronic kidney disease. Patients in the oral hydration group were encouraged to drink unrestricted amounts of fluids freely whereas isotonic saline infusion was performed by the standard protocol in the IV hydration group. Results: CI-AKI occurred in 8/116 patients (6.9%) in the oral hydration group and 8/109 patients (7.3%) in the IV hydration group (p = 0.89). There was also no statistically significant difference between the two groups when different CI-AKI definitions were taken into account. Conclusion: Oral hydration is as effective as IV hydration in preventing CI-AKI in patients with normal kidney function or stage 1-2 chronic kidney disease, and who also have at least one of the other high-risk factors for developing CI-AKI.

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          Most cited references 18

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          GPOWER: A general power analysis program

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            A simple risk score for prediction of contrast-induced nephropathy after percutaneous coronary intervention: development and initial validation.

            We sought to develop a simple risk score of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Although several risk factors for CIN have been identified, the cumulative risk rendered by their combination is unknown. A total of 8,357 patients were randomly assigned to a development and a validation dataset. The baseline clinical and procedural characteristics of the 5,571 patients in the development dataset were considered as candidate univariate predictors of CIN (increase >or=25% and/or >or=0.5 mg/dl in serum creatinine at 48 h after PCI vs. baseline). Multivariate logistic regression was then used to identify independent predictors of CIN with a p value 75 years, anemia, and volume of contrast) were assigned a weighted integer; the sum of the integers was a total risk score for each patient. The overall occurrence of CIN in the development set was 13.1% (range 7.5% to 57.3% for a low [ or=16] risk score, respectively); the rate of CIN increased exponentially with increasing risk score (Cochran Armitage chi-square, p < 0.0001). In the 2,786 patients of the validation dataset, the model demonstrated good discriminative power (c statistic = 0.67); the increasing risk score was again strongly associated with CIN (range 8.4% to 55.9% for a low and high risk score, respectively). The risk of CIN after PCI can be simply assessed using readily available information. This risk score can be used for both clinical and investigational purposes.
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              Pathophysiology of contrast medium-induced nephropathy.

              Contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a well-known cause of acute renal failure, but the development of CIN remains poorly understood. A number of studies have been performed with the one aim, to shed some light onto the pathophysiology of CIN. These have led to manifold interpretations and sometimes contradicting conclusions. This review critically surveys mechanisms believed to mediate CIN by highlighting the complex pathophysiologic entity, including altered rheologic properties, perturbation of renal hemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto- and paracrine factors [adenosine, endothelin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)], and direct cytotoxic effects. Moreover, the importance of physicochemical properties of contrast media are made clear. The more recently developed iso-osmolar contrast media are dimers, not monomers as the widely used nonionic low osmolar contrast media. The dimers have physicochemical features different from other contrast media which may be of clinical importance, not only with respect to osmolality. The viscosity of the commercially available dimers is considerably higher than blood. Many experimental studies provide evidence for a greater perturbation in renal functions by dimeric contrast media in comparison to nonionic monomeric contrast media. Clinical trials have yielded conflicting results.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEC
                Nephron Clin Pract
                10.1159/issn.1660-2110
                Nephron Clinical Practice
                S. Karger AG
                1660-2110
                2014
                December 2014
                04 November 2014
                : 128
                : 1-2
                : 95-100
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Cardiology, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, and bDepartment of Cardiology, Acibadem Maslak Hospital, Istanbul, and cDepartment of Cardiology, Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey
                Author notes
                *Sukru Akyuz, MD, Tibbiye cad. No: 13 Haydarpasa, TR-34660 Istanbul (Turkey), E-Mail sukruakyuz@hotmail.com
                Article
                365090 Nephron Clin Pract 2014;128:95-100
                10.1159/000365090
                25378376
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 4, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Original Paper

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