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Environmental behavior of explosives in groundwater from the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in aquatic and wetland plant treatments. Uptake and fate of TNT and RDX in plants.

Chemosphere

Autoradiography, Biotransformation, Carbon Radioisotopes, Chromatography, Thin Layer, Ecosystem, Fresh Water, Plants, metabolism, Tissue Distribution, Triazines, pharmacokinetics, Trinitrotoluene, Water Pollutants, Chemical

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      Abstract

      Uptake and fate of TNT and RDX by three aquatic and four wetland plants were studied using hydroponic, batch, incubations in explosives-contaminated groundwater amended with [U-14C]-TNT or [U-14C]-RDX in the laboratory. Substrates in which the plants were rooted were also tested. Plants and substrates were collected from a small-scale wetland constructed for explosives removal, and groundwater originated from a local aquifer at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant. This study demonstrated rapid uptake of [U-14C]-TNT derived 14C, concentration at the uptake sites and limited transport in all plants. Per unit of mass, uptake was higher in submersed than in emergent species. Biotransformation of TNT had occurred in all plant treatments after 7-day incubation in 1.6 to 3.4 mg TNT L-i, with labeled amino-dinitrotoluenes (ADNTs), three unidentified compounds unique for plants, and mostly polar products as results. Biotransformation occurred also in the substrates, yielding labeled ADNT, one unidentified compound unique for substrates, and polar products. TNT was not recovered by HPLC in plants and substrates after incubation. Uptake of [U-14C]-RDX derived 14C in plants was slower than that of TNT, transport was substantial, and concentration occurred at sites where new plant material was synthesized. As for TNT, uptake per unit of mass was higher in submersed than in emergent species. Biotransformation of RDX had occurred in all plant treatments after 13-day incubation in 1.5 mg RDX L-1, with one unidentified compound unique for plants, and mostly polar products as results. Biotransformation had occurred also in the substrates, but to a far lower extent than in plants. Substrates and plants had one unidentified 14C-RDX metabolite in common. HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of RDX in most plants and in three out of four substrates at the end of the incubation period.

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      10576106

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