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      Marriage of black phosphorus and Cu 2+ as effective photothermal agents for PET-guided combination cancer therapy

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          Abstract

          The use of photothermal agents (PTAs) in cancer photothermal therapy (PTT) has shown promising results in clinical studies. The rapid degradation of PTAs may address safety concerns but usually limits the photothermal stability required for efficacious treatment. Conversely, PTAs with high photothermal stability usually degrade slowly. The solutions that address the balance between the high photothermal stability and rapid degradation of PTAs are rare. Here, we report that the inherent Cu 2+-capturing ability of black phosphorus (BP) can accelerate the degradation of BP, while also enhancing photothermal stability. The incorporation of Cu 2+ into BP@Cu nanostructures further enables chemodynamic therapy (CDT)-enhanced PTT. Moreover, by employing 64Cu 2+, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can be achieved for in vivo real-time and quantitative tracking. Therefore, our study not only introduces an “ideal” PTA that bypasses the limitations of PTAs, but also provides the proof-of-concept application of BP-based materials in PET-guided, CDT-enhanced combination cancer therapy.

          Abstract

          A balance between high stability and rapid degradation is required for effective photothermal anti-cancer agents. Here, the authors use Cu 2+ to accelerate the degradation of black phosphorus nanosheets while enhancing its photothermal ability and apply this material for PET-guided, CDT-enhanced combination cancer therapy in mice.

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          Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

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            Nanomedicine in cancer therapy: challenges, opportunities, and clinical applications.

            Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available therapies are inadequate and spur demand for improved technologies. Rapid growth in nanotechnology towards the development of nanomedicine products holds great promise to improve therapeutic strategies against cancer. Nanomedicine products represent an opportunity to achieve sophisticated targeting strategies and multi-functionality. They can improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional therapeutics and may thus optimize the efficacy of existing anti-cancer compounds. In this review, we discuss state-of-the-art nanoparticles and targeted systems that have been investigated in clinical studies. We emphasize the challenges faced in using nanomedicine products and translating them from a preclinical level to the clinical setting. Additionally, we cover aspects of nanocarrier engineering that may open up new opportunities for nanomedicine products in the clinic.
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              Chemodynamic Therapy: Tumour Microenvironment-Mediated Fenton and Fenton-like Reactions

              Tailored to the specific tumour microenvironment, which involves acidity and the overproduction of hydrogen peroxide, advanced nanotechnology has been introduced to generate the hydroxyl radical (. OH) primarily for tumour chemodynamic therapy (CDT) through the Fenton and Fenton-like reactions. Numerous studies have investigated the enhancement of CDT efficiency, primarily the increase in the amount of . OH generated. Notably, various strategies based on the Fenton reaction have been employed to enhance . OH generation, including nanomaterials selection, modulation of the reaction environment, and external energy fields stimulation, which are discussed systematically in this Minireview. Furthermore, the potential challenges and the methods used to facilitate CDT effectiveness are also presented to support this cutting-edge research area.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                liang.steven@mgh.harvard.edu
                l_wang1009@foxmail.com
                wtao@bwh.harvard.edu
                zhang.ming-rong@qst.go.jp
                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-1723
                8 June 2020
                8 June 2020
                2020
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 5900 003X, GRID grid.482503.8, Department of Advanced Nuclear Medicine Sciences, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, , National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, ; Chiba, 2638555 Japan
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1760 3828, GRID grid.412601.0, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT-MRI Center, , The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, ; Guangzhou, 510630 China
                [3 ]ISNI 000000041936754X, GRID grid.38142.3c, Center for Nanomedicine and Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, , Harvard Medical School, ; Boston, 02115 MA USA
                [4 ]ISNI 000000041936754X, GRID grid.38142.3c, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, , Harvard Medical School, ; Boston, 02114 MA USA
                Article
                16513
                10.1038/s41467-020-16513-0
                7280494
                32513979
                3acd959e-f4e8-4d9f-bb66-b3f552a91294
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100012639, METAvivor;
                Award ID: No. 2018A020560
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Uncategorized
                cancer,biomaterials,nanoscale materials
                Uncategorized
                cancer, biomaterials, nanoscale materials

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