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      Clinical and Echographic Long-Term Follow-Up of a Retinal Macrocyst: A Case Report

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          Abstract

          The purpose of this paper is to report the case of a 62-year-old male diagnosed with a retinal macrocyst secondary to a long-standing retinal detachment in his right eye. At fundoscopy examination, an oval, elevated retinal lesion in the superior nasal quadrant was noted. Ultrasonography was performed, with a B-mode echography showing an oval, anechoic image and a standardized A-mode echography with a reflectivity spike higher than 98%, which was compatible with a retinal macrocyst. The patient refused surgical treatment for the retinal detachment and was followed for 14 months with stable visual acuity and no clinical or echographic changes.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Hemorrhagic intraretinal macrocyst: Differential diagnoses and report of an unusual case

          Retinal ‘cysts’ may be single or multiple, ranging from two-to-ten disc diameters in size, and occur in eyes with longstanding retinal detachment. The authors describe a retinal macrocyst larger than ten disc diameters, with a blood-filled cavity, and its ultrasound findings. Improved retinal nourishment following retinal reattachment gradually reverses the process responsible for cystic degeneration, with the eventual collapse of the cyst (within days or weeks). Surprisingly, this giant cyst did not collapse for almost three years despite retinal reattachment. The internal mobile echogenic contents were suggestive of blood. The possible reason of blood in the cyst could be rupture of the retinal blood vessels in the cyst cavity. This could be a recurrent phenomenon, which did not allow the cyst to collapse. The Hemorrhagic Intraretinal Macrocyst needs to be differentiated from mimicking clinical conditions, namely, retinoschisis, choroidal melanoma, subretinal abscess, choroidal hemangioma, and the like. It could take up to a few years to collapse spontaneously, following successful retinal reattachment.
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            Internal drainage of a retinal macrocyst with an Nd: YAG laser to aid primary retinal reattachment

             KR Mendis,  SA Hewick (2009)
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              Asymptomatic bilateral simultaneous rhegmatogenous retinal detachments.

               B Patil,  L Mowatt,  S. Ho (2005)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                COP
                COP
                10.1159/issn.1663-2699
                Case Reports in Ophthalmology
                S. Karger AG
                1663-2699
                2014
                May – August 2014
                05 June 2014
                : 5
                : 2
                : 168-171
                Affiliations
                Instituto de Oftalmologia ‘Conde de Valenciana', Mexico City, Mexico
                Author notes
                *Juan Carlos Serna-Ojeda, MD, Instituto de Oftalmologia ‘Conde de Valenciana', Chimalpopoca 14, Mexico City 06800 (Mexico), E-Mail juanc.sernao@gmail.com
                Article
                363759 PMC4086044 Case Rep Ophthalmol 2014;5:168-171
                10.1159/000363759
                PMC4086044
                25028580
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) ( http://www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Pages: 4
                Categories
                Published: June 2014

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