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Cardiac troponins in intensive care

1, 2

Critical Care

BioMed Central

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      Abstract

      The cardiac troponins are integral components of the myofibrillary apparatus and they regulate muscle contraction. The measurement of cardiac troponins has replaced other biomarkers for the specific detection of myocardial necrosis and for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. The tissue specificity plus sensitivity of the measurement technology has meant that cardiac damage can be detected in circumstances other than conventional acute coronary syndromes. The ability to specifically detect cardiac damage as part of multiple organ failure in intensive care patients has been shown to provide prognostic information, but it is unclear whether this is a dependent or an independent marker of outcome.

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      Most cited references 21

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      Myocardial infarction redefined--a consensus document of The Joint European Society of Cardiology/American College of Cardiology Committee for the redefinition of myocardial infarction.

      This document was developed by a consensus conference initiated by Kristian Thygesen, MD, and Joseph S. Alpert, MD, after formal approval by Lars Rydén, MD, President of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), and Arthur Garson, MD, President of the American College of Cardiology (ACC). All of the participants were selected for their expertise in the field they represented, with approximately one-half of the participants selected from each organization. Participants were instructed to review the scientific evidence in their area of expertise and to attend the consensus conference with prepared remarks. The first draft of the document was prepared during the consensus conference itself. Sources of funding appear in Appendix A. The recommendations made in this document represent the attitudes and opinions of the participants at the time of the conference, and these recommendations were revised subsequently. The conclusions reached will undoubtedly need to be revised as new scientific evidence becomes available. This document has been reviewed by members of the ESC Committee for Scientific and Clinical Initiatives and by members of the Board of the ESC who approved the document on April 15, 2000.* Copyright 2000 The European Society of Cardiology.
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        Cardiac-specific troponin I levels to predict the risk of mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

        In patients with acute coronary syndromes, it is desirable to identify a sensitive serum marker that is closely related to the degree of myocardial damage, provides prognostic information, and can be measured rapidly. We studied the prognostic value of cardiac troponin I levels in patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. In a multicenter study, blood specimens from 1404 symptomatic patients were analyzed for cardiac troponin I, a serum marker not detected in the blood of healthy persons. The relation between mortality at 42 days and the level of cardiac troponin I in the specimen obtained on enrollment was determined both before and after adjustment for baseline characteristics. The mortality rate at 42 days was significantly higher in the 573 patients with cardiac troponin I levels of at least 0.4 ng per milliliter (21 deaths, or 3.7 percent) than in the 831 patients with cardiac troponin I levels below 0.4 ng per milliliter (8 deaths, or 1.0 percent; P or = 65 years). In patients with acute coronary syndromes, cardiac troponin I levels provide useful prognostic information and permit the early identification of patients with an increased risk of death.
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          Cardiac troponin T levels for risk stratification in acute myocardial ischemia. GUSTO IIA Investigators.

          The prognosis of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial ischemia is quite variable. We examined the value of serum levels of cardiac troponin T, serum creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) levels, and electrocardiographic abnormalities for risk stratification in patients with acute myocardial ischemia. We studied 855 patients within 12 hours of the onset of symptoms. Cardiac troponin T levels, CK-MB levels, and electrocardiograms were analyzed in a blinded fashion at the core laboratory. We used logistic regression to assess the usefulness of baseline levels of cardiac troponin T and CK-MB and the electrocardiographic category assigned at admission-ST-segment elevation, ST-segment depression, T-wave inversion, or the presence of confounding factors that impair the detection of ischemia (bundle-branch block and paced rhythms)-in predicting outcome. On admission, 289 of 801 patients with base-line serum samples had elevated troponin T levels (> 0.1 ng per milliliter). Mortality within 30 days was significantly higher in these patients than in patients with lower levels of troponin T (11.8 percent vs. 3.9 percent, P < 0.001). The troponin T level was the variable most strongly related to 30-day mortality (chi-square = 21, P < 0.001), followed by the electrocardiographic category (chi-square = 14, P = 0.003) and the CK-MB level (chi-square = 11, P = 0.004). Troponin T levels remained significantly predictive of 30-day mortality in a model that contained the electrocardiographic categories and CK-MB levels (chi-square = 9.2, P = 0.027). The cardiac troponin T level is a powerful, independent risk marker in patients who present with acute myocardial ischemia. It allows further stratification of risk when combined with standard measures such as electrocardiography and the CK-MB level.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1]Consultant Chemical Pathologist, Department of Chemical Pathology, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
            [2]Cardiac Research Scientist, Department of Chemical Pathology, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
            Contributors
            Journal
            Crit Care
            Critical Care
            BioMed Central (London)
            1364-8535
            1466-609X
            2005
            20 July 2005
            : 9
            : 4
            : 345-346
            1269477
            cc3776
            16137382
            10.1186/cc3776
            Copyright © 2005 BioMed Central Ltd
            Categories
            Commentary

            Emergency medicine & Trauma

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