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      Normalization of Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance through Immunotherapy: CD4+ T Cells Control Glucose Homeostasis

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          Abstract

          Progressive obesity and its associated metabolic syndromes represent a globally growing challenge, yet mechanistic understanding and current therapeutics are unsatisfactory. We discovered that CD4+ T-lymphocytes, resident in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), control insulin-resistance in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice and likely humans. DIO VAT-associated T cells display biased TCR-Vα repertoires suggesting antigen-specific expansion. CD4+ T-lymphocyte control of glucose homeostasis is compromised in DIO when VAT accumulates pathogenic IFNγ-secreting Th1 cells, overwhelming static numbers of Th2 (CD4+GATA-3+) and regulatory Foxp3+ T cells. CD4+ T cell transfer into DIO, lymphocyte-free RAG null mice reversed weight gain and insulin resistance predominately through Th2 cells. Brief systemic treatment with αCD3 antibody or its F(ab′) 2 fragment, restores the Th1/Foxp3+ balance and reverses insulin resistance for months, despite continuing high-fat diet. The progression of obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities is physiologically under CD4+ T cell control, with expansion of adipose tissue-resident T cells that can be manipulated by immunotherapy.

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          Most cited references 43

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          Inflammation and metabolic disorders.

          Metabolic and immune systems are among the most fundamental requirements for survival. Many metabolic and immune response pathways or nutrient- and pathogen-sensing systems have been evolutionarily conserved throughout species. As a result, immune response and metabolic regulation are highly integrated and the proper function of each is dependent on the other. This interface can be viewed as a central homeostatic mechanism, dysfunction of which can lead to a cluster of chronic metabolic disorders, particularly obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Collectively, these diseases constitute the greatest current threat to global human health and welfare.
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            Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization.

            Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80(+)CD11c(+) population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or "alternatively activated" macrophages, including Ym1, arginase 1, and Il10. Diet-induced obesity decreased expression of these genes in ATMs while increasing expression of genes such as those encoding TNF-alpha and iNOS that are characteristic of M1 or "classically activated" macrophages. Interestingly, ATMs from obese C-C motif chemokine receptor 2-KO (Ccr2-KO) mice express M2 markers at levels similar to those from lean mice. The antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which was overexpressed in ATMs from lean mice, protected adipocytes from TNF-alpha-induced insulin resistance. Thus, diet-induced obesity leads to a shift in the activation state of ATMs from an M2-polarized state in lean animals that may protect adipocytes from inflammation to an M1 proinflammatory state that contributes to insulin resistance.
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              Mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

              Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In obese individuals, adipose tissue releases increased amounts of non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol, hormones, pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that are involved in the development of insulin resistance. When insulin resistance is accompanied by dysfunction of pancreatic islet beta-cells - the cells that release insulin - failure to control blood glucose levels results. Abnormalities in beta-cell function are therefore critical in defining the risk and development of type 2 diabetes. This knowledge is fostering exploration of the molecular and genetic basis of the disease and new approaches to its treatment and prevention.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                9502015
                8791
                Nat Med
                Nat. Med.
                Nature medicine
                1078-8956
                1546-170X
                9 March 2011
                26 July 2009
                August 2009
                23 March 2011
                : 15
                : 8
                : 921-929
                CAMS1704
                10.1038/nm.2001
                3063199
                19633657

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