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Conserved loci of leaf and stem rust fungi of wheat share synteny interrupted by lineage-specific influx of repeat elements

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      Abstract

      Background

      Wheat leaf rust ( Puccinia triticina Eriks; Pt) and stem rust fungi ( P. graminis f.sp. tritici; Pgt) are significant economic pathogens having similar host ranges and life cycles, but different alternate hosts. The Pt genome, currently estimated at 135 Mb, is significantly larger than Pgt, at 88 Mb, but the reason for the expansion is unknown. Three genomic loci of Pt conserved proteins were characterized to gain insight into gene content, genome complexity and expansion.

      Results

      A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was made from P. triticina race 1, BBBD and probed with Pt homologs of genes encoding two predicted Pgt secreted effectors and a DNA marker mapping to a region of avirulence. Three BACs, 103 Kb, 112 Kb, and 166 Kb, were sequenced, assembled, and open reading frames were identified. Orthologous genes were identified in Pgt and local conservation of gene order (microsynteny) was observed. Pairwise protein identities ranged from 26 to 99%. One Pt BAC, containing a RAD18 ortholog, shares syntenic regions with two Pgt scaffolds, which could represent both haplotypes of Pgt. Gene sequence is diverged between the species as well as within the two haplotypes. In all three BAC clones, gene order is locally conserved, however, gene shuffling has occurred relative to Pgt. These regions are further diverged by differing insertion loci of LTR-retrotransposon, Gypsy, Copia, Mutator, and Harbinger mobile elements. Uncharacterized Pt open reading frames were also found; these proteins are high in lysine and similar to multiple proteins in Pgt.

      Conclusions

      The three Pt loci are conserved in gene order, with a range of gene sequence divergence. Conservation of predicted haustoria expressed secreted protein genes between Pt and Pgt is extended to the more distant poplar rust, Melampsora larici-populina. The loci also reveal that genome expansion in Pt is in part due to higher occurrence of repeat-elements in this species.

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      Most cited references 34

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      Protein structure prediction on the Web: a case study using the Phyre server.

      Determining the structure and function of a novel protein is a cornerstone of many aspects of modern biology. Over the past decades, a number of computational tools for structure prediction have been developed. It is critical that the biological community is aware of such tools and is able to interpret their results in an informed way. This protocol provides a guide to interpreting the output of structure prediction servers in general and one such tool in particular, the protein homology/analogy recognition engine (Phyre). New profile-profile matching algorithms have improved structure prediction considerably in recent years. Although the performance of Phyre is typical of many structure prediction systems using such algorithms, all these systems can reliably detect up to twice as many remote homologies as standard sequence-profile searching. Phyre is widely used by the biological community, with >150 submissions per day, and provides a simple interface to results. Phyre takes 30 min to predict the structure of a 250-residue protein.
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        Repbase Update, a database of eukaryotic repetitive elements.

        Repbase Update is a comprehensive database of repetitive elements from diverse eukaryotic organisms. Currently, it contains over 3600 annotated sequences representing different families and subfamilies of repeats, many of which are unreported anywhere else. Each sequence is accompanied by a short description and references to the original contributors. Repbase Update includes Repbase Reports, an electronic journal publishing newly discovered transposable elements, and the Transposon Pub, a web-based browser of selected chromosomal maps of transposable elements. Sequences from Repbase Update are used to screen and annotate repetitive elements using programs such as Censor and RepeatMasker. Repbase Update is available on the worldwide web at http://www.girinst.org/Repbase_Update.html.
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          Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium.

          Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes and account for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity, indicative of horizontal acquisition. Experimentally, we demonstrate the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, converting a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in F. oxysporum. These findings put the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]USDA-ARS, Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit, Department of Plant Pathology, Manhattan, KS, 66506, USA
            [2 ]Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Summerland, BC, V0H 1Z0, Canada
            [3 ]Broad Institute, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA, 02142, UK
            [4 ]USDA-ARS, Cereal Disease Laboratory, 1551 Lindig, St. Paul, MN, 55108, UK
            Contributors
            Journal
            BMC Genomics
            BMC Genomics
            BMC Genomics
            BioMed Central
            1471-2164
            2013
            29 January 2013
            : 14
            : 60
            23356831
            3579696
            1471-2164-14-60
            10.1186/1471-2164-14-60
            Copyright ©2013 Fellers et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Research Article

            Genetics

            synteny, wheat leaf rust, bac construction

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