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      Alcohol marketing and youth alcohol consumption: a systematic review of longitudinal studies published since 2008 : Alcohol marketing and youth drinking

      1 , 2 , 3 , 1 , 4
      Addiction
      Wiley

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          Abstract

          Youth alcohol consumption is a major global public health concern. Previous reviews have concluded that exposure to alcohol marketing was associated with earlier drinking initiation and higher alcohol consumption among youth. This review examined longitudinal studies published since those earlier reviews.

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          Most cited references27

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          Binge drinking and associated health risk behaviors among high school students.

          Underage drinking contributes to the 3 leading causes of death (unintentional injury, homicide, and suicide) among persons aged 12 to 20 years. Most adverse health effects from underage drinking stem from acute intoxication resulting from binge drinking. Although binge drinking, typically defined as consuming > or = 5 drinks on an occasion, is a common pattern of alcohol consumption among youth, few population-based studies have focused specifically on the characteristics of underage binge drinkers and their associated health risk behaviors. We analyzed data on current drinking, binge drinking, and other health risk behaviors from the 2003 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using SAS and SUDAAN statistical software. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between different patterns of alcohol consumption and health risk behaviors. Overall, 44.9% of high school students reported drinking alcohol during the past 30 days (28.8% binge drank and 16.1% drank alcohol but did not binge drink). Although girls reported more current drinking with no binge drinking, binge-drinking rates were similar among boys and girls. Binge-drinking rates increased with age and school grade. Students who binge drank were more likely than both nondrinkers and current drinkers who did not binge to report poor school performance and involvement in other health risk behaviors such as riding with a driver who had been drinking, being currently sexually active, smoking cigarettes or cigars, being a victim of dating violence, attempting suicide, and using illicit drugs. A strong dose-response relationship was found between the frequency of binge drinking and the prevalence of other health risk behaviors. Binge drinking is the most common pattern of alcohol consumption among high school youth who drink alcohol and is strongly associated with a wide range of other health risk behaviors. Effective intervention strategies (eg, enforcement of the minimum legal drinking age, screening and brief intervention, and increasing alcohol taxes) should be implemented to prevent underage alcohol consumption and adverse health and social consequences resulting from this behavior.
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            Exploring college students' use of general and alcohol-related social media and their associations with alcohol-related behaviors.

            Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors.
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              The commercial use of digital media to market alcohol products: a narrative review.

              The rising use of digital media in the last decade, including social networking media and downloadable applications, has created new opportunities for marketing a wide range of goods and services, including alcohol products. This paper aims to review the evidence in order to answer a series of policy-relevant questions: does alcohol marketing through digital media influence drinking behaviour or increases consumption; what methods of promotional marketing are used, and to what extent; and what is the evidence of marketing code violations and especially of marketing to children?
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Addiction
                Addiction
                Wiley
                09652140
                January 2017
                January 2017
                November 08 2016
                : 112
                : 7-20
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore MD USA
                [2 ]Department of Community Medicine and Health Care; University of Connecticut School of Medicine; Farmington CT USA
                [3 ]UK Health Forum; London UK
                [4 ]Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia; Curtin University; Perth WA Australia
                Article
                10.1111/add.13591
                27565582
                3bb5a463-a8d6-4127-9876-b5326d821a0a
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions

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