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      Analysis of Serum Zinc and Copper Concentrations in Hair Loss

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          Abstract

          Background

          It is well known that some trace elements such as zinc and copper play a significant role in many forms of hair loss. However, the effect of zinc and copper in the pathogenesis of hair loss is still unknown.

          Objective

          The purpose of this study is to evaluate the zinc and copper status in each of four types of hair loss.

          Methods

          A study was carried out with 30 health controls and 312 patients who were diagnosed with alopecia areata (AA), male pattern hair loss, female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium (TE) (2008 to 2011; Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital). Zinc and copper serum concentrations were evaluated between controls and each of four types of hair loss patients.

          Results

          In all of the hair loss patients, the mean serum zinc was 84.33±22.88, significantly lower than the control group (97.94±21.05 µg/dl) ( p=0.002), whereas the serum copper was 96.44±22.62, which was not significantly different ( p=0.975). The analysis of each group showed that all groups of hair loss had statistically lower zinc concentration, but not copper concentrations. However, the ratio of the patients with serum zinc concentration lower than 70 µg/dl was significantly high in only the AA group (odds ratio, OR 4.02; confidence interval, CI 1.13 to 14.31) and the TE group (OR 1.12; CI 1.12 to 17.68).

          Conclusion

          The data led to the hypothesis of zinc metabolism disturbances playing a key role in hair loss, especially AA and TE, whereas the effect of copper on hair growth and shedding cycles still needs more study.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Mammalian zinc transport, trafficking, and signals.

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            Male pattern baldness: classification and incidence.

            The need for a widely accepted, accurate, and reproducible standard of classification for male pattern baldness has increased with the advent and increasing popularity of hair transplant surgery. This report establishes such a classification, and reports its use in determining the incidence of male pattern baldness at various ages in 1,000 white adult male subjects. The action of testosterone as an incitant in male pattern baldness is well known, but this study points out the continued effect of time, even in later years. Since most hair transplant surgery is peformed on subjects with male pattern baldness, and because the success of hair transplant surgery is largely dependent on proper patient selection, a complete understanding of male pattern baldness is essential for consistently good results with hair transplantation.
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              Classification of the types of androgenetic alopecia (common baldness) occurring in the female sex.

              Androgenetic alopecia in the female occurs much more frequently than is generally believed. The condition is still considered infrequent, for it differs, in its clinical picture and in the sequence of events leading to it, from common baldness in men. To facilitate an early diagnosis (desirable in view of the therapeutic possibilities by means of antiandrogens) a classification of the stages of the common form (female type) of androgenetic alopecia in women is presented. The exceptionally observed male type of androgenetic alopecia can be classified according to Hamilton or to the modification of this classification proposed by Ebling & Rook.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ann Dermatol
                Ann Dermatol
                AD
                Annals of Dermatology
                Korean Dermatological Association; The Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology
                1013-9087
                2005-3894
                November 2013
                30 November 2013
                : 25
                : 4
                : 405-409
                Affiliations
                Department of Dermatology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Sang Seok Kim, Department of Dermatology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, 150 Seongan-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-701, Korea. Tel: 82-2-2224-2285, Fax: 82-2-474-7913, kimss@ 123456hallym.or.kr
                Article
                10.5021/ad.2013.25.4.405
                3870206
                24371385
                Copyright © 2013 The Korean Dermatological Association and The Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Article

                Dermatology

                zinc, alopecia, copper

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