10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      An organismal concept for Sengelia radicans gen. et sp. nov. – morphology and natural history of an Early Devonian lycophyte

      ,
      Annals of Botany
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          <p id="d12881919e118"> <b>Background and Aims</b> Fossil plants are found as fragmentary remains and understanding them as natural species requires assembly of whole-organism concepts that integrate different plant parts. Such concepts are essential for incorporating fossils in hypotheses of plant evolution and phylogeny. Plants of the Early Devonian are crucial to reconstructing the initial radiation of tracheophytes, yet few are understood as whole organisms. </p><p id="d12881919e123"> <b>Methods</b> This study assembles a whole-plant concept for the Early Devonian lycophyte <i>Sengelia radicans</i> gen. et sp. nov., based on morphometric data and taphonomic observations from &gt;1000 specimens collected in the Beartooth Butte Formation (Wyoming, USA). </p><p id="d12881919e131"> <b>Key Results</b> <i>Sengelia radicans</i> occupies a key position between stem-group and derived lycophyte lineages. <i>Sengelia</i> had a rooting system of downward-growing root-bearing stems, formed dense monotypic mats of prostrate shoots in areas that experienced periodic flooding, and was characterized by a life-history strategy adapted for survival after floods, dominated by clonality, and featuring infrequent sexual reproduction. </p><p id="d12881919e142"> <b>Conclusions</b> <i>Sengelia radicans</i> is the oldest among the very few early tracheophytes for which a detailed, rigorous whole-plant concept integrates morphology, growth habit, life history and growth environment. This plant adds to the diversity of body plans documented among lycophytes and may help elucidate patterns of morphological evolution in the clade. </p>

          Related collections

          Most cited references44

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Kin recognition in an annual plant

          Kin recognition is important in animal social systems. However, though plants often compete with kin, there has been as yet no direct evidence that plants recognize kin in competitive interactions. Here we show in the annual plant Cakile edentula, allocation to roots increased when groups of strangers shared a common pot, but not when groups of siblings shared a pot. Our results demonstrate that plants can discriminate kin in competitive interactions and indicate that the root interactions may provide the cue for kin recognition. Because greater root allocation is argued to increase below-ground competitive ability, the results are consistent with kin selection.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Root exudates mediate kin recognition in plants

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              XXVI.—On Old Red Sandstone Plants showing Structure, from the Rhynie Chert Bed, Aberdeenshire. Part III. Asteroxylon Mackiei, Kidston and Lang

              Asteroxylon Mackieiwas a plant of more complicated organisation and larger size than eitherRhyniaorHornea, which have been described from the silicified peat-bed at Rhynie in the two preceding papers of this series. The generic name refers to the stellate outline of the xylem of the stem as seen in cross section, while the specific name commemorates the original discovery of the plant remains by Dr Mackie.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annals of Botany
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0305-7364
                1095-8290
                May 01 2017
                May 01 2017
                : 119
                : 7
                : 1097-1113
                Article
                10.1093/aob/mcw277
                5604611
                28334100
                3be960de-104d-47f4-a620-c976fd88e0bd
                © 2017
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article