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      AFLP: a new technique for DNA fingerprinting.

      Nucleic Acids Research

      Base Sequence, DNA Fingerprinting, methods, DNA Ligases, DNA Primers, DNA, Bacterial, genetics, DNA, Fungal, DNA, Plant, DNA, Viral, Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific, metabolism, Genome, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Polymerase Chain Reaction

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          Abstract

          A novel DNA fingerprinting technique called AFLP is described. The AFLP technique is based on the selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments from a total digest of genomic DNA. The technique involves three steps: (i) restriction of the DNA and ligation of oligonucleotide adapters, (ii) selective amplification of sets of restriction fragments, and (iii) gel analysis of the amplified fragments. PCR amplification of restriction fragments is achieved by using the adapter and restriction site sequence as target sites for primer annealing. The selective amplification is achieved by the use of primers that extend into the restriction fragments, amplifying only those fragments in which the primer extensions match the nucleotides flanking the restriction sites. Using this method, sets of restriction fragments may be visualized by PCR without knowledge of nucleotide sequence. The method allows the specific co-amplification of high numbers of restriction fragments. The number of fragments that can be analyzed simultaneously, however, is dependent on the resolution of the detection system. Typically 50-100 restriction fragments are amplified and detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The AFLP technique provides a novel and very powerful DNA fingerprinting technique for DNAs of any origin or complexity.

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          7501463
          307397

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