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      Large deletions induced by Cas9 cleavage

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          CRISPR/Cas9 targeting events cause complex deletions and insertions at 17 sites in the mouse genome

          Although CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has provided numerous opportunities to interrogate the functional significance of any given genomic site, there is a paucity of data on the extent of molecular scars inflicted on the mouse genome. Here we interrogate the molecular consequences of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletions at 17 sites in four loci of the mouse genome. We sequence targeted sites in 632 founder mice and analyse 54 established lines. While the median deletion size using single sgRNAs is 9 bp, we also obtain large deletions of up to 600 bp. Furthermore, we show unreported asymmetric deletions and large insertions of middle repetitive sequences. Simultaneous targeting of distant loci results in the removal of the intervening sequences. Reliable deletion of juxtaposed sites is only achieved through two-step targeting. Our findings also demonstrate that an extended analysis of F1 genotypes is required to obtain conclusive information on the exact molecular consequences of targeting events.
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            Somatic CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tumour suppressor disruption enables versatile brain tumour modelling

            In vivo functional investigation of oncogenes using somatic gene transfer has been successfully exploited to validate their role in tumorigenesis. For tumour suppressor genes this has proven more challenging due to technical aspects. To provide a flexible and effective method for investigating somatic loss-of-function alterations and their influence on tumorigenesis, we have established CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene disruption, allowing for in vivo targeting of TSGs. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach by deleting single (Ptch1) or multiple genes (Trp53, Pten, Nf1) in the mouse brain, resulting in the development of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) we characterized the medulloblastoma-driving Ptch1 deletions in detail and show that no off-targets were detected in these tumours. This method provides a fast and convenient system for validating the emerging wealth of novel candidate tumour suppressor genes and the generation of faithful animal models of human cancer.
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              Detailed Phenotypic and Molecular Analyses of Genetically Modified Mice Generated by CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Editing

              The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted for use as a genome editing tool. While several recent reports have indicated that successful genome editing of mice can be achieved, detailed phenotypic and molecular analyses of the mutant animals are limited. Following pronuclear micro-injection of fertilized eggs with either wild-type Cas9 or the nickase mutant (D10A) and single or paired guide RNA (sgRNA) for targeting of the tyrosinase (Tyr) gene, we assessed genome editing in mice using rapid phenotypic readouts (eye and coat color). Mutant mice with insertions or deletions (indels) in Tyr were efficiently generated without detectable off-target cleavage events. Gene correction of a single nucleotide by homologous recombination (HR) could only occur when the sgRNA recognition sites in the donor DNA were modified. Gene repair did not occur if the donor DNA was not modified because Cas9 catalytic activity was completely inhibited. Our results indicate that allelic mosaicism can occur following -Cas9-mediated editing in mice and appears to correlate with sgRNA cleavage efficiency at the single-cell stage. We also show that larger than expected deletions may be overlooked based on the screening strategy employed. An unbiased analysis of all the deleted nucleotides in our experiments revealed that the highest frequencies of nucleotide deletions were clustered around the predicted Cas9 cleavage sites, with slightly broader distributions than expected. Finally, additional analysis of founder mice and their offspring indicate that their general health, fertility, and the transmission of genetic changes were not compromised. These results provide the foundation to interpret and predict the diverse outcomes following CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing experiments in mice.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                August 2018
                August 8 2018
                August 2018
                : 560
                : 7717
                : E8-E9
                Article
                10.1038/s41586-018-0380-z
                30089922
                3c191edb-c708-4e89-af04-a0791f698ace
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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