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      Late-onset renal hypertrophy and dysfunction in mice lacking CTRP1

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          Abstract

          Local and systemic factors that influence renal structure and function in aging are not well understood. The secretory protein C1q/TNF-related protein 1 (CTRP1) regulates systemic metabolism and cardiovascular function. We provide evidence here that CTRP1 also modulates renal physiology in an age- and sex-dependent manner. In mice lacking CTRP1, we observed significantly increased kidney weight and glomerular hypertrophy in aged male but not female or young mice. Although glomerular filtration rate, plasma renin and aldosterone levels, and renal response to water restriction did not differ between genotypes, CTRP1-deficient male mice had elevated blood pressure. Echocardiogram and pulse wave velocity measurements indicated normal heart function and vascular stiffness in CTRP1-deficient animals, and increased blood pressure was not due to greater salt retention. Paradoxically, CTRP1-deficient mice had elevated urinary sodium and potassium excretion, partially resulting from reduced expression of genes involved in renal sodium and potassium reabsorption. Despite renal hypertrophy, markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were reduced in CTRP1-deficient mice. RNA sequencing revealed alterations and enrichments of genes in metabolic processes in CTRP1-deficient animals. These results highlight novel contributions of CTRP1 to aging-associated changes in renal physiology.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          8804484
          3815
          FASEB J
          FASEB J
          FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
          0892-6638
          1530-6860
          4 December 2020
          26 December 2019
          February 2020
          16 December 2020
          : 34
          : 2
          : 2657-2676
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [2 ]Center for Metabolism and Obesity Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [3 ]Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [4 ]Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [5 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [6 ]Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [7 ]Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
          [8 ]Kidney Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
          Author notes

          Present address

          Blythe D. Shepard, Department of Human Science, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia

          Stefanie Y. Tan, Pfizer, Cambridge, Massachusetts

          Andrew Wolfe, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

          Dan E. Berkowitz, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama

          AUTHORS’ CONTRIBUTIONS

          S. Rodriguez and G.W. Wong contributed to the experimental design; S. Rodriguez, H.C. Little, P. Daneshpajouhnejad, B. D. Shepard, S. Y. Tan, A. Wolfe, M.U. Cheema, D.E. Berkowitz, and S. Jandu performed the experiments; C.C. Talbot performed RNA-seq data analysis; O. M. Woodward, D.E. Berkowitz, A. Z. Rosenberg, and J.L. Pluznick provided technical input; S. Rodriguez and G.W. Wong analyzed and interpreted the data; S. Rodriguez and G.W. Wong wrote the paper.

          Correspondence: G. William Wong, Department of Physiology and the Center for Metabolism and Obesity Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. gwwong@ 123456jhmi.edu
          Article
          PMC7739198 PMC7739198 7739198 nihpa1651145
          10.1096/fj.201900558RR
          7739198
          31908037
          3c1d2ddb-6a28-4b0c-be44-3a85bb384eef
          History
          Categories
          Article

          kidney function,C1q/TNF-related protein 1,aging-associated renal physiology

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