6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Evaluation of Sexual Functioning in Depressed Outpatients: A Double-Blind Comparison of Sustained-Release Bupropion and Sertraline Treatment :

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Sexual dysfunction is a frequently reported side effect of many antidepressants, including serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion, an antidepressant of the aminoketone class, is relatively free of adverse sexual effects. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, sustained-release bupropion (bupropion SR) and sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, were found to be similarly efficacious in the treatment of outpatients with moderate to severe depression. This report describes the results of a double-blind comparison of the sexual side effect profiles of bupropion SR and sertraline. Two hundred forty-eight patients who had received a diagnosis of moderate to severe major depression were randomly assigned to receive treatment with bupropion SR (100-300 mg/day) or sertraline (50-200 mg/day) for 16 weeks. Eligible patients were required to be in a stable relationship and to have normal sexual functioning. Sexual functioning was assessed by the investigator at each clinic visit using investigator-rated structured interviews. A significantly greater percentage of sertraline-treated patients (63% and 41% of men and women, respectively) developed sexual dysfunction compared with bupropion SR-treated patients (15% and 7%, respectively). Sexual dysfunction was noted as early as day 7 in sertraline-treated patients at a dose of 50 mg/day and persisted until the end of the 16-week treatment phase. Four patients, all of whom were treated with sertraline, discontinued from the study prematurely because of sexual dysfunction. Given the similar efficacy of the two drugs in treating depression, bupropion SR may be a more appropriate antidepressant choice than sertraline in patients for whom sexual dysfunction is a concern.

          Related collections

          Most cited references10

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The effects of steroidal contraceptives on the well-being and sexuality of women: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-centre study of combined and progestogen-only methods.

          A placebo-controlled, double-blind study was carried out to assess the direct hormonal effects of combined and progestogen-only oral contraceptives on well-being and sexuality of women in two contrasting cultures. One-hundred-fifty women, who had been sterilised or whose partners had been vasectomised, were recruited from two centres-Manila, Philippines, and Edinburgh, Scotland. After one month pretreatment assessment, women were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (combined oral contraceptive (COC), progestogen-only pill (POP), or placebo; 50 within each treatment group, 25 per centre) and continued on treatment for four months. Assessment was by daily ratings, questionnaires and interviews. The COC adversely affected sexuality in the Edinburgh women, with 12 of the 25 women in this group also reporting the side effect of reduced sexual interest. There were modest negative effects of the combined pill on mood, more noticeable in the Edinburgh women. The POP was associated with no adverse effects on sexuality and some improvement in well-being in both centres. Possible explanations for the apparent lack of adverse effects in the Manila women are discussed. The negative effects reported may be less evident in women using the COC for contraceptive purposes but may lead to discontinuation in some women and warrant further investigation.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Somatic Symptoms in Primary Affective Disorder

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Comparative sexual side effects of bupropion, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline.

              To investigate patient reported prosexual side effects of the aminoketone antidepressant bupropion (INN, amfebutamone) and to compare directly the sexual side effects of bupropion and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline. One hundred seven psychiatric outpatient respondents receiving current treatment with one of the above antidepressants anonymously completed questionnaires that allowed reporting of both decreases and increases in sexual function. The main outcome measures were antidepressant-associated changes in libido, arousal, duration of time from arousal to orgasm, intensity of orgasm, and duration of orgasm relative to that experienced before the onset of the patients' psychiatric illnesses. Bupropion-treated patients reported significant increases in libido, level of arousal, intensity of orgasm, and duration of orgasm beyond levels experienced premorbidly. The three SSRIs to an equal degree significantly decreased libido, arousal, duration of orgasm, and intensity of orgasm below levels experienced premorbidly. Overall, 27% of the SSRI-treated patients had no adverse sexual side effects; in contrast, 86% of patients treated with bupropion had no adverse sexual effects, and 77% of bupropion-treated patients reported at least one aspect of heightened sexual functioning. SSRI-induced adverse sexual effects appear to be the rule rather than the exception and may be substantially underreported unless patients are specifically asked about the effects of these medications on various aspects of sexual function. In contrast, prosexual effects were reported by the majority of patients treated with bupropion. The findings are reviewed in light of the neurochemistry of these agents and the sexual response.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
                Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0271-0749
                2000
                April 2000
                : 20
                : 2
                : 122-128
                Article
                10.1097/00004714-200004000-00002
                10770448
                3c3f5692-e79c-4451-ae9b-b930dd335400
                © 2000
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article