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      Participation in local food projects is associated with better psychological well-being: evidence from the East of England

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      Journal of Public Health

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          Background

          Studies suggest that local food may contribute to well-being, but do not use standardized measures, or control groups.

          Methods

          An online survey compared participants of local food initiatives (n = 302) with members of the general population (n = 157) in terms of scores on standardized measures of well-being and distress. Using hierarchical ordinary least squares regression models, we explored the relationship between participation and well-being via four mediators—nature connectedness, psychological need satisfaction, diet and physical activity.

          Results

          Participants scored higher than non-participants on life satisfaction (t(346) = 2.30, P = 0.02, ρr = 0.12) and the WEMWBS scale (t(335) = 2.12, P = 0.04, ρr = 0.10), but differences in psychological distress were insignificant. More actively engaged participants scored higher on positive well-being and longer duration participation was associated with higher life satisfaction and less psychological distress. Finally, we found that participation contributes to psychological need satisfaction, better diet and connection to nature, three known drivers of well-being.

          Conclusions

          Well-being may be a co-benefit of local food initiatives beyond the physical and psychological benefits of growing food. Further research is needed to explore the mediators driving these effects, quantify benefits, and track impacts over time and across different social groups.

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          Most cited references 27

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          Multicollinearity in Regression Analysis: The Problem Revisited

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            Fruit and vegetable intake among urban community gardeners.

            To determine the association between household participation in a community garden and fruit and vegetable consumption among urban adults. Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional random phone survey conducted in 2003. A quota sampling strategy was used to ensure that all census tracts within the city were represented. Flint, Michigan. 766 adults. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured using questionnaire items from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Household participation in a community garden was assessed by asking the respondent if he or she, or any member of the household, had participated in a community garden project in the last year. Generalized linear models and logistic regression models assessed the association between household participation in a community garden and fruit and vegetable intake, controlling for demographic, neighborhood participation, and health variables. Adults with a household member who participated in a community garden consumed fruits and vegetables 1.4 more times per day than those who did not participate, and they were 3.5 times more likely to consume fruits and vegetables at least 5 times daily. Household participation in a community garden may improve fruit and vegetable intake among urban adults.
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              Vitalizing effects of being outdoors and in nature

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Public Health
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1741-3842
                1741-3850
                July 08 2019
                July 08 2019
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, 183 East Road, Cambridge, UK
                [2 ]School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Tower Building, 70 Park Place, Cardiff, UK
                [3 ]Norwich Business School, University of East Anglia, Earlham Road, Norwich, UK
                [4 ]University of Exeter Business School, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, UK
                Article
                10.1093/pubmed/fdz057
                © 2019

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model

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