1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found
      Is Open Access

      The Association between Mental Health Symptoms and Quality and Safety of Patient Care before and during COVID-19 among Canadian Nurses

      , , , ,

      Healthcare

      MDPI AG

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          (1) Background: While the association between nurse mental health and quality and safety of patient care delivery was well documented pre-pandemic, fewer research studies have examined this relationship in the context of COVID-19. This study examines the impact of various mental health symptoms experienced by nurses on quality and safety before and during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) Methods: A secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 4729 and 3585 nurses in one Canadian province between December 2019 and June-July 2020 was conducted. Data were analyzed using between group difference tests and logistic regression; (3) Results: Compared to pre-COVID-19, during COVID-19 nurses reported a higher safety grade, a greater likelihood of recommending their units for care and lower quality of nursing care. Most mental health symptoms were higher during COVID-19 and higher levels of mental health symptoms were correlated with lower ratings of quality and safety both pre- and during COVID-19; (4) Conclusion: Mental health symptoms have implications for nurses’ quality and safety of patient care delivery, with the association between mental health symptoms and quality and safety following a dose–response relationship before and during COVID-19. These findings suggest that it is worthwhile for nurse mental health symptoms to be included as hospital level performance metrics.

          Related collections

          Most cited references35

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder: the GAD-7.

          Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common mental disorders; however, there is no brief clinical measure for assessing GAD. The objective of this study was to develop a brief self-report scale to identify probable cases of GAD and evaluate its reliability and validity. A criterion-standard study was performed in 15 primary care clinics in the United States from November 2004 through June 2005. Of a total of 2740 adult patients completing a study questionnaire, 965 patients had a telephone interview with a mental health professional within 1 week. For criterion and construct validity, GAD self-report scale diagnoses were compared with independent diagnoses made by mental health professionals; functional status measures; disability days; and health care use. A 7-item anxiety scale (GAD-7) had good reliability, as well as criterion, construct, factorial, and procedural validity. A cut point was identified that optimized sensitivity (89%) and specificity (82%). Increasing scores on the scale were strongly associated with multiple domains of functional impairment (all 6 Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form General Health Survey scales and disability days). Although GAD and depression symptoms frequently co-occurred, factor analysis confirmed them as distinct dimensions. Moreover, GAD and depression symptoms had differing but independent effects on functional impairment and disability. There was good agreement between self-report and interviewer-administered versions of the scale. The GAD-7 is a valid and efficient tool for screening for GAD and assessing its severity in clinical practice and research.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The PHQ-9

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review and meta-analysis

              Highlights • At least one in five healthcare professionals report symptoms of depression and anxiety. • Almost four in 10 healthcare workers experience sleeping difficulties and/or insomnia. • Rates of anxiety and depression were higher for female healthcare workers and nursing staff. • Milder mood symptoms are common and screening should aim to identify mild and sub-threshold syndromes.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Healthcare
                Healthcare
                MDPI AG
                2227-9032
                February 2022
                February 07 2022
                : 10
                : 2
                : 314
                Article
                10.3390/healthcare10020314
                3ca243de-4da0-41ef-adb9-cebea9af7c4d
                © 2022
                Product
                Self URI (article page): https://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/10/2/314

                Comments

                Comment on this article