Blog
About

7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Efficacy of Prucalopride in bowel cleansing before colonoscopy: Results of a pilot study

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Colonoscopy is a crucial diagnostic instrument for colorectal cancer screening and an adequate bowel preparation is definitely decisive for the success of the procedure. Especially in elderly patients, bowel cleansing is considered a big issue, because it is often poorly tolerated for many reasons (like inability to swallow large volume of liquids or unlikable taste); this can cause a suboptimal preparation that may lead to miss a neoplastic lesion. There is relatively little data about how to improve preparation tolerability. The purpose of our pilot study was to analyze the effect of prucalopride (Resolor ®), a highly selective serotonin 5HT4 receptor agonist used for chronic constipation for its ability to stimulate gastrointestinal peristalsis, undertaken the day before colonoscopy, followed by half volume of polyethylene glycol solution. We found that this can be a good and safe method to achieve an adequate and better-tolerated colon cleansing.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 5

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Improving the quality of colonoscopy bowel preparation using an educational video.

          Colonoscopy is the preferred modality for colon cancer screening. A successful colonoscopy requires proper bowel preparation. Adequate bowel preparation continues to remain a limiting factor. One hundred thirty-three patients scheduled for an outpatient colonoscopy were prospectively randomized in a single-blinded manner to video or nonvideo group. In addition to written bowel preparation instructions, patients in the video group viewed a brief instructional video. Quality of colon preparation was measured using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Quality scale, while patient satisfaction with preparation was evaluated using a questionnaire. Statistical analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the instructional colonoscopy video. There were significant differences in the quality of colonoscopy preparation between the video and the nonvideo groups. Participants who watched the video had better preparation scores in the right colon (P=0.0029), mid-colon (P=0.0027), rectosigmoid (P=0.0008), fluid content (P=0.03) and aggregate score (median score 4 versus 5; P=0.0002). There was no difference between the two groups with regard to patient satisfaction. Income, education level, sex, age and family history of colon cancer had no impact on quality of colonoscopy preparation or patient satisfaction. The addition of an instructional bowel preparation video significantly improved the quality of colon preparation.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Bowel preparation for colonoscopy: entering an era of increased expectations for efficacy.

             Douglas Rex (2014)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prucalopride succinate for the treatment of constipation: an update.

              Constipation is a disorder frequently complained about by patients in daily clinical practice. However, to date, its treatment is still commonly unsatisfactory, especially concerning patients' quality of life, when using conventional measures. Prucalopride, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, was introduced to the market in 2009 and has been commercially available in Europe since 2010. The main effect of prucalopride is to stimulate colonic motility, which explains its efficacy to treat constipated patients unresponsive to other regimens. Literature search was carried out to look for effects of prucalopride on constipated patients. Several papers were found demonstrating that prucalopride is effective in treatment of constipated patients. Due to its few side effects, the lack of cardiovascular effects and interactions with other drugs, prucalopride may be safely used in elderly people as well.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                World J Gastrointest Endosc
                WJGE
                World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
                Baishideng Publishing Group Inc
                1948-5190
                16 November 2017
                16 November 2017
                : 9
                : 11
                : 558-560
                Affiliations
                Department of Digestive Endoscopy, School of Medicine and Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy
                Department of Digestive Endoscopy, School of Medicine and Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy
                Department of Digestive Endoscopy, School of Medicine and Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy
                Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, San Giovanni-Addolorata Hospital, 00184 Rome, Italy
                Department of Digestive Endoscopy, School of Medicine and Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, 00189 Rome, Italy
                Author notes

                Author contributions: Corleto VD, D’Alba L and di Giulio E planned the study, performed all the colonoscopies and revised the final version of the paper; Antonelli G and Coluccio C enrolled patients, obtained informed consent, interpreted the data, wrote and revised the paper; all authors approved the final version.

                Correspondence to: Vito Domenico Corleto, MD, Department of Digestive Endoscopy, School of Medicine and Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy. vito.corleto@ 123456uniroma1.it

                Telephone: +39-6-33776150 Fax: +39-6-33776692

                Article
                jWJGE.v9.i11.pg558
                10.4253/wjge.v9.i11.558
                5696608
                ©The Author(s) 2017. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.

                Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Categories
                Letters To The Editor

                Comments

                Comment on this article