Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      CEP120 interacts with C2CD3 and Talpid3 and is required for centriole appendage assembly and ciliogenesis

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Centrosomal protein 120 (CEP120) was originally identified as a daughter centriole-enriched protein that participates in centriole elongation. Recent studies showed that CEP120 gene mutations cause complex ciliopathy phenotypes in humans, including Joubert syndrome and Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy, suggesting that CEP120 plays an additional role in ciliogenesis. To investigate the potential roles of CEP120 in centriole elongation and cilia formation, we knocked out the CEP120 gene in p53-deficient RPE1 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, and performed various analyses. We herein report that loss of CEP120 produces short centrioles with no apparent distal and subdistal appendages. CEP120 knockout was also associated with defective centriole elongation, impaired recruitment of C2CD3 and Talpid3 to the distal ends of centrioles, and consequent defects in centriole appendage assembly and cilia formation. Interestingly, wild-type CEP120 interacts with C2CD3 and Talpid3, whereas a disease-associated CEP120 mutant (I975S) has a low affinity for C2CD3 binding and perturbs cilia assembly. Together, our findings reveal a novel role of CEP120 in ciliogenesis by showing that it interacts with C2CD3 and Talpid3 to assemble centriole appendages and by illuminating the molecular mechanism through which the CEP120 (I975S) mutation causes complex ciliopathies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Cep164, a novel centriole appendage protein required for primary cilium formation

          Primary cilia (PC) function as microtubule-based sensory antennae projecting from the surface of many eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in mechano- and chemosensory perception and their dysfunction is implicated in developmental disorders and severe diseases. The basal body that functions in PC assembly is derived from the mature centriole, a component of the centrosome. Through a small interfering RNA screen we found several centrosomal proteins (Ceps) to be involved in PC formation. One newly identified protein, Cep164, was indispensable for PC formation and hence characterized in detail. By immunogold electron microscopy, Cep164 could be localized to the distal appendages of mature centrioles. In contrast to ninein and Cep170, two components of subdistal appendages, Cep164 persisted at centrioles throughout mitosis. Moreover, the localizations of Cep164 and ninein/Cep170 were mutually independent during interphase. These data implicate distal appendages in PC formation and identify Cep164 as an excellent marker for these structures.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Centriole distal appendages promote membrane docking, leading to cilia initiation.

            The distal appendages (DAPs) of centrioles have been proposed to anchor cilia to the plasma membrane, but their molecular composition, assembly, and exact function in ciliogenesis remain poorly understood. Using quantitative centrosome proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we identified five DAP components, including one previously described (CEP164), one partially characterized (CEP89 [ccdc123]), and three novel (CEP83 [ccdc41], SCLT1, and FBF1) DAP proteins. Analyses of DAP assembly revealed a hierarchy. CEP83 recruits both SCLT1 and CEP89 to centrioles. Subsequent recruitment of FBF1 and CEP164 is independent of CEP89 but mediated by SCLT1. All five DAP components are essential for ciliogenesis; loss of CEP83 specifically blocks centriole-to-membrane docking. Undocked centrioles fail to recruit TTBK2 or release CP110, the two earliest modifications found on centrioles prior to cilia assembly, revealing centriole-to-membrane docking as a temporal and spatial cue promoting cilia initiation.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Cep97 and CP110 suppress a cilia assembly program.

              Mammalian centrioles play a dynamic role in centrosome function, but they also have the capacity to nucleate the assembly of cilia. Although controls must exist to specify these different fates, the key regulators remain largely undefined. We have purified complexes associated with CP110, a protein that plays an essential role in centrosome duplication and cytokinesis, and have identified a previously uncharacterized protein, Cep97, that recruits CP110 to centrosomes. Depletion of Cep97 or expression of dominant-negative mutants results in CP110 disappearance from centrosomes, spindle defects, and polyploidy. Remarkably, loss of Cep97 or CP110 promotes primary cilia formation in growing cells, and enforced expression of CP110 in quiescent cells suppresses their ability to assemble cilia, suggesting that Cep97 and CP110 collaborate to inhibit a ciliogenesis program. Identification of Cep97 and other genes involved in regulation of cilia assembly may accelerate our understanding of human ciliary diseases, including renal disease and retinal degeneration.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                tktang@ibms.sinica.edu.tw
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                15 April 2019
                15 April 2019
                2019
                : 9
                Affiliations
                ISNI 0000 0001 2287 1366, GRID grid.28665.3f, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, , Academia Sinica, ; Taipei, Taiwan
                Article
                42577
                10.1038/s41598-019-42577-0
                6465297
                30988386
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100004663, Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan);
                Award ID: MOST 107-2321-B001-006
                Award ID: MOST 107-2321-B001-006
                Award ID: MOST 107-2321-B001-006
                Award ID: MOST 107-2321-B001-006
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100001869, Academia Sinica;
                Award ID: AS-IA-104-L01
                Award ID: As-TP-108-L08
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article