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      Rothia bacteremia: a 10-year experience at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

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          Abstract

          Rothia spp. are Gram-positive cocco-bacilli that cause a wide range of serious infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Risk factors for Rothia mucilaginosa (previously known as Stomatococcus mucilaginosus) bacteremia include prolonged and profound neutropenia, malignancy, and an indwelling vascular foreign body. Here, we describe 67 adults at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, from 2002 to 2012 with blood cultures positive for Rothia. Twenty-five of these patients had multiple positive blood cultures, indicating true clinical infection. Among these, 88% (22/25) were neutropenic, and 76% (19/25) had leukemia. Common sources of bacteremia were presumed gut translocation, mucositis, and catheter-related infection. One patient died with Rothia infection. Neutropenic patients were less likely to have a single positive blood culture than were nonneutropenic patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 21% of the isolates. All of the tested isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and most beta-lactams; however, four of six tested isolates were resistant to oxacillin. There was no difference between the neutropenic and nonneutropenic patients in need of intensive care unit care, mortality, or attributable mortality.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Clin. Microbiol.
          Journal of clinical microbiology
          1098-660X
          0095-1137
          Sep 2014
          : 52
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
          [2 ] Department of Pharmacy, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
          [3 ] Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA tosh.pritish@mayo.edu.
          Article
          JCM.01270-14
          10.1128/JCM.01270-14
          4313135
          24951810
          Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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