Blog
About

11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Problematic video game use as an emotional coping strategy: Evidence from a sample of MMORPG gamers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          A positive relationship between problematic gaming and escapism motivation to play video games has been well established, suggesting that problematic gaming may result from attempts to deal with negative emotions. However, to date, no study has examined how emotion dysregulation affects both escapism motives and problematic gaming patterns.

          Methods

          Difficulties in emotion regulation, escapism, and problematic involvement with video games were assessed in a sample of 390 World of Warcraft players. A structural equation modeling framework was used to test the hypothesis that escapism mediates the relationship between emotion dysregulation and problematic gaming.

          Results

          Statistical analyses showed that difficulties in emotion regulation predicted both escapism motives and problematic gaming, and that escapism partially mediated this relationship.

          Conclusion

          Our findings support the view that problematic players are likely to escape in online games as a maladaptive coping strategy for dealing with adverse emotional experiences.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 56

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A ‘components’ model of addiction within a biopsychosocial framework

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            An international consensus for assessing internet gaming disorder using the new DSM-5 approach.

            For the first time, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduces non-substance addictions as psychiatric diagnoses. The aims of this paper are to (i) present the main controversies surrounding the decision to include internet gaming disorder, but not internet addiction more globally, as a non-substance addiction in the research appendix of the DSM-5, and (ii) discuss the meaning behind the DSM-5 criteria for internet gaming disorder. The paper also proposes a common method for assessing internet gaming disorder. Although the need for common diagnostic criteria is not debated, the existence of multiple instruments reflect the divergence of opinions in the field regarding how best to diagnose this condition. We convened international experts from European, North and South American, Asian and Australasian countries to discuss and achieve consensus about assessing internet gaming disorder as defined within DSM-5. We describe the intended meaning behind each of the nine DSM-5 criteria for internet gaming disorder and present a single item that best reflects each criterion, translated into the 10 main languages of countries in which research on this condition has been conducted. Using results from this cross-cultural collaboration, we outline important research directions for understanding and assessing internet gaming disorder. As this field moves forward, it is critical that researchers and clinicians around the world begin to apply a common methodology; this report is the first to achieve an international consensus related to the assessment of internet gaming disorder. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Online gaming addiction? Motives predict addictive play behavior in massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

              Recently, there have been growing concerns about excessive online gaming. Playing Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) appears to be particularly problematic, because these games require a high degree of commitment and time investment from the players to the detriment of occupational, social, and other recreational activities and relations. A number of gaming motives have been linked to excessive online gaming in adolescents and young adults. We assessed 175 current MMORPG players and 90 nonplayers using a Web-based questionnaire regarding their gaming behavior, problems as consequences of gaming, and game motivations and tested their statistical associations. Results indicated that (a) MMORPG players are significantly more likely to experience gaming-related problems relative to nonplayers, and that (b) the gaming motivations escapism and mechanics significantly predicted excessive gaming and appeared as stronger predictors than time investment in game. The findings support the necessity of using measures that distinguish between different types of online games. In addition, this study proves useful regarding the current discussion on establishing (online) gaming addiction as a diagnosis in future categorizations of psychopathology.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Behav Addict
                J Behav Addict
                jba
                JBA
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                11 February 2019
                March 2019
                : 8
                : 1
                : 25-34
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychological and Educational Sciences, University of Palermo , Palermo, Italy
                [2 ]Istituto per le Tecnologie Didattiche, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche , Palermo, Italy
                [3 ]Addictive and Compulsive Behaviours Laboratory, Institute for Health and Behaviours, University of Luxembourg , Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
                [4 ]Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, UKE – Kore University of Enna , Enna, Italy
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: Maria Di Blasi; Department of Psychological and Educational Sciences, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 15, Palermo 90100, Italy; Phone: +39 091 238 97717; Fax: +39 091 651 3825; E-mail: maria.diblasi@ 123456unipa.it
                Article
                10.1556/2006.8.2019.02
                7044601
                30739460
                © 2019 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 64, Pages: 10
                Product
                Funding
                Funding sources: No financial support was received for this study.
                Categories
                Full-Length Report

                Comments

                Comment on this article