5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Artemether attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory bone loss by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption via suppression of MAPK signaling pathway

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Osteolysis is an osteolytic lesion featured by enhanced osteoclast formation and potent bone erosion. Lacking of effective regimen for treatment of the pathological process highlights the importance of identifying agents that can suppress the differentiation and function of osteoclast. Artemether is a natural compound derived from Artemisia annua L. and it is popularized for the treatment of malaria. In present study, we demonstrated that artemether could suppress RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and expression of osteoclast marker genes such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase 9, nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1, and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein. It inhibited the osteoclastic bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Furthermore, artemether attenuated RANKL-induced MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p-38) activity. In addition, we have showed that artemether was able to mitigate bone erosion in a murine model of LPS-induced inflammatory bone loss. Taken together, these findings suggest that artemether reduces inflammatory bone loss via inhibition of MAPKs activation during osteoclast differentiation, and it might be a potential candidate for the treatment of osteoclast-related disorders.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 37

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Birth and death of bone cells: basic regulatory mechanisms and implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoporosis.

          The adult skeleton regenerates by temporary cellular structures that comprise teams of juxtaposed osteoclasts and osteoblasts and replace periodically old bone with new. A considerable body of evidence accumulated during the last decade has shown that the rate of genesis of these two highly specialized cell types, as well as the prevalence of their apoptosis, is essential for the maintenance of bone homeostasis; and that common metabolic bone disorders such as osteoporosis result largely from a derangement in the birth or death of these cells. The purpose of this article is 3-fold: 1) to review the role and the molecular mechanism of action of regulatory molecules, such as cytokines and hormones, in osteoclast and osteoblast birth and apoptosis; 2) to review the evidence for the contribution of changes in bone cell birth or death to the pathogenesis of the most common forms of osteoporosis; and 3) to highlight the implications of bone cell birth and death for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of present and future pharmacotherapeutic agents for osteoporosis.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Qinghaosu (artemisinin): an antimalarial drug from China.

             D L Klayman (1985)
            The herb Artemisia annua has been used for many centuries in Chinese traditional medicine as a treatment for fever and malaria. In 1971, Chinese chemists isolated from the leafy portions of the plant the substance responsible for its reputed medicinal action. This compound, called qinghaosu (QHS, artemisinin), is a sesquiterpene lactone that bears a peroxide grouping and, unlike most other antimalarials, lacks a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic ring system. The compound has been used successfully in several thousand malaria patients in China, including those with both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Derivatives of QHS, such as dihydroqinghaosu, artemether, and the water-soluble sodium artesunate, appear to be more potent than QHS itself. Sodium artesunate acts rapidly in restoring to consciousness comatose patients with cerebral malaria. Thus QHS and its derivatives offer promise as a totally new class of antimalarials.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              NFATc1 induces osteoclast fusion via up-regulation of Atp6v0d2 and the dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP).

              NFATc1 has been characterized as a master regulator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation. Herein, we demonstrate a novel role for NFATc1 as a positive regulator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand-mediated osteoclast fusion as well as other fusion-inducing factors such as TNF-alpha. Exogenous overexpression of a constitutively active form of NFATc1 in bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage cells (BMMs) induces formation of multinucleated osteoclasts as well as the expression of fusion-mediating molecules such as the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase V(o) domain (Atp6v0d2) and the dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). Moreover, inactivation of NFATc1 by cyclosporin A treatment attenuates expression of Atp6v0d2 and DC-STAMP and subsequent fusion process of osteoclasts. We show that NFATc1 binds to the promoter regions of Atp6v0d2 and DC-STAMP in osteoclasts and directly induces their expression. Furthermore, overexpression of Atp6v0d2 and DC-STAMP rescues cell-cell fusion of preosteoclasts despite reduced NFATc1 activity. Our data indicate for the first time that the NFATc1/Atp6v0d2 and DC-STAMP signaling axis plays a key role in the osteoclast multinucleation process, which is essential for efficient bone resorption.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                +86 13656635123 , zrjwsj@zju.edu.cn
                Journal
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death Dis
                Cell Death & Disease
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-4889
                27 April 2018
                27 April 2018
                May 2018
                : 9
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1759 700X, GRID grid.13402.34, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, , Zhejiang University, ; Hangzhou, 310009 China
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1759 700X, GRID grid.13402.34, Orthopedic Research Institute of Zhejiang University, ; Hangzhou, 310009 China
                Article
                540
                10.1038/s41419-018-0540-y
                5924411
                29703893
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Cell biology

                Comments

                Comment on this article