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      Taxonomy of the genus Longipeditermes Holmgren (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) from the Greater Sundas, Southeast Asia

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          Abstract

          More than 200 colonies of the genus Longipeditermes were collected in our field surveys across the Sundaland region of Southeast Asia from 1998 to 2014. Two species, L. kistneri Akhtar & Ahmad and L. logipes Holmgren, are recognized and redescribed with color photographs of the workers and major soldiers. We use variation in characters of soldier caste (head capsules, antennae, and pronotum) and worker caste (antennae and mandibles) to distinguish these two species. Longipeditermes kistneri seems to prefer high-altitude forests (above 1,000 m) and has so far been found exclusively in Java and Sumatra, while L. logipes seems to prefer lowland and swamp forests and is widespread in the Greater Sundas.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Diversity and Evolution of Caste Patterns

           Yves Roisin (2000)
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            The role of termites in an equatorial rain forest ecosystem of West Malaysia

            To estimate the rate of consumption of leaf litter by termites on the forest floor of Pasoh Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan, West Malaysia, newly fallen leaves were marked and distributed on the ground. The loss of leaf area due to termites was determined either photometrically or visually. An average of 1.70% of the total surface area of the leaf litter disappeared per week in experiment 1 and 1.25% in experiment 2 in Plot 1, and 2.9% per day in other plots located near the mounds of Macrotermes carbonarius. The amount of leaf litter accumulation in the Ao layer was estimated at about 2.3 t/ha at Plot 1, so it was likely that an amount equivalent to about 32% of the daily leaf-litter fall was transported by M. carbonarius to their mounds in experiment 1 and 22% in experiment 2. It was considered that the termites had an important role in the detritus food chain of the ecosystem.
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              The Enemies and Defense Mechanisms of Termites

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zoosystematics and Evolution
                ZSE
                Pensoft Publishers
                1860-0743
                1435-1935
                May 29 2019
                May 29 2019
                : 95
                : 2
                : 309-318
                Article
                10.3897/zse.95.31636
                © 2019

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