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      From Immersion to Addiction in Videogames

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      People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction (HCI)

      Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction

      1 - 5 September 2008

      Videogames, immersion, addiction, engagement

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          Abstract

          Immersion is commonly described by gamers and gamereviewers as an important aspect of a videogame. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the immersive experience of videogames and the addictive nature of games. Building on Charlton’s (2002) study of addiction and engagement in computing, we conducted a questionnaire study of people who play videogames. It seems that videogames blur the distinction between addiction and high engagement even more than generic computing. In a follow up diary study, the degree of immersion whilst playing was found to be strongly correlated (r=0.763) with the addiction/engagement score. Overall, these studies suggest that the degree of immersive experience is closely related to how addictive or engaging people find videogames and moreover that addiction seems to be an extreme form of engagement and immersion.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Depth of Presence in Virtual Environments

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            A factor-analytic investigation of computer 'addiction' and engagement.

            Evidence supporting the application of Brown's (1991, 1993) conception of behavioural addiction to computing behaviour is presented. Questionnaire items tapping Brown's addiction criteria were factor-analysed along with others, including computer apathy-engagement and computer anxiety-comfort items of Charlton and Birkett (1995). Items relating to some of Brown's criteria (tolerance, euphoria, and cognitive salience) were found to be complex, an Addiction factor loading upon them but an Engagement factor loading more highly. Items tapping other criteria (conflict, withdrawal, behavioural salience, and relapse and reinstatement) were shown to be factor pure, with only the addiction factor loading highly upon them. It is concluded that Brown's conception of behavioural addiction can be applied to computer-related behaviour, although the relationship of milder facets of addiction, which are also merely indicative of high engagement, to computer-related addictions is non-unique. It is also concluded that classifying individuals as exhibiting pathological computer use using checklists based upon adaptations of DSM criteria for pathological gambling is likely to overestimate the number of people addicted to computing activities.
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              EverQuest—It’s Just a Computer Game Right? An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Online Gaming Addiction

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2008
                September 2008
                : 55-63
                Affiliations
                University College London

                31-32 Alfred Place

                London WC1E 7DP, UK
                University of York

                Heslington

                York YO10 5DD, UK

                +44 1904 434751
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2008.6
                © May-li Seah et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction
                HCI
                22
                Conference Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
                1 - 5 September 2008
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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