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      Home Range Size and Habitat use by Cat Ba Langurs (Trachypithecus poliocephalus) in a Disturbed and Fragmented Habitat

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          A review of models of home range for animal movement

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            Factors Influencing Leaf Choice by Howler Monkeys: A Test of Some Hypotheses of Food Selection by Generalist Herbivores

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              The ecology and macroecology of mammalian home range area.

              Although many studies employ allometric relationships to demonstrate possible dependence of various traits on body mass, the relationship between home range size and body mass has been perhaps the most difficult to understand. Early studies demonstrated that carnivorous species had larger home ranges than herbivorous species of similar mass. These studies also argued that scaling relations (e.g., slopes) of the former were steeper than those of the latter and explained this in terms of the distribution of food resources, which are more uniformly distributed for most herbivores than for carnivores. In contrast to these studies, we show that scaling relations of home ranges for carnivorous mammals do not differ significantly from those of herbivorous and omnivorous species and that all three exhibit slopes that are significantly steeper than predicted on the basis of energetic requirements. We also demonstrate that home range size is constrained to fit within a polygonal constraint space bounded by lines representing energetic and/or biophysical limitations, which suggests that the log-linear relationship between home range area and mass may not be the appropriate function to compare against the energetically predicted slopes of 0.75 or 1.0. It remains unclear, however, why the slope of the relationship between home range area and body mass, whether based on raw data or on constraint lines, always exceeds that predicted by the energetic needs hypothesis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Primatology
                Int J Primatol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0164-0291
                1573-8604
                August 2018
                July 16 2018
                August 2018
                : 39
                : 4
                : 547-566
                Article
                10.1007/s10764-018-0051-9
                3eb6c0f3-bf09-4ce2-abac-813d82ab9d73
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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