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      HED Meteorites and Their Relationship to the Geology of Vesta and the Dawn Mission

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          Origin of the cataclysmic Late Heavy Bombardment period of the terrestrial planets.

          The petrology record on the Moon suggests that a cataclysmic spike in the cratering rate occurred approximately 700 million years after the planets formed; this event is known as the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB). Planetary formation theories cannot naturally account for an intense period of planetesimal bombardment so late in Solar System history. Several models have been proposed to explain a late impact spike, but none of them has been set within a self-consistent framework of Solar System evolution. Here we propose that the LHB was triggered by the rapid migration of the giant planets, which occurred after a long quiescent period. During this burst of migration, the planetesimal disk outside the orbits of the planets was destabilized, causing a sudden massive delivery of planetesimals to the inner Solar System. The asteroid belt was also strongly perturbed, with these objects supplying a significant fraction of the LHB impactors in accordance with recent geochemical evidence. Our model not only naturally explains the LHB, but also reproduces the observational constraints of the outer Solar System.
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            Asteroid vesta: spectral reflectivity and compositional implications.

            The spectral reflectivity (0.30 to 1.10 microns) of several asteroids has been measured for the first time. The reflection spectrum for Vesta contains a strong absorption band centered near 0.9 micron and a weaker absorption feature between 0.5 and 0.6 micron. The reflectivity decreases strongly in the ultraviolet. The reflection spectrum for the asteroid Pallas and probably for Ceres does not contain the 0.9-micron band. Vesta shows the strongest and best-defined absorption bands yet seen in the reflection spectrum for the solid surface of an object in the solar system. The strong 0.9-micron band arises from electronic absorptions in ferrous iron on the M2 site of a magnesian pyroxene. Comparison with laboratory measurements on meteorites and Apollo 11 samples indicates that the surface of Vesta has a composition very similar to that of certain basaltic achondrites.
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              Early solar system timescales according to 53Mn-53Cr systematics

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Space Science Reviews
                Space Sci Rev
                Springer Nature
                0038-6308
                1572-9672
                December 2011
                March 2010
                : 163
                : 1-4
                : 141-174
                Article
                10.1007/s11214-010-9637-z
                3ec75535-ef0f-4ac3-90a7-a6d73be1b2dc
                © 2011
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11214-010-9637-z

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