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      Efficacy of an acquainted drug in the treatment of inflammatory low back pain: sulfasalazine under investigation

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          Abstract

          In the current study, the overall prevalence and the main underlying etiologies of inflammatory low back pain (ILBP) were determined, and the effectiveness of treatment with sulfasalazine was investigated in patients with inflammatory versus mechanical low back pain (LBP). In a prospective study conducted from July 2013 until August 2015, 1,779 consecutive patients within the age range of 18–50 years with a primary complaint of LBP referring to the rheumatology clinics were included. The patients were classified into two distinct groups: those suffering from ILBP (n=118) and those having mechanical LBP (n=1,661). Patients were followed-up for assessing the response rate to sulfasalazine with a mean follow-up time of 16 months. Results showed that among the total number of participants, 6.6% suffered from ILBP. The main underlying diagnoses of ILBP were undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (USpA) (61.0%) and ankylosing spondylitis (24.6%). During the follow-up period, 3.4% of the participants had an appropriate response to only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 57.6% to sulfasalazine, 26.3% to addition of methotrexate to the previous regimen, and 12.7% to biological agents. Multiple logistic regression results showed that the underlying disease had a significant effect on the sulfasalazine response. The odds for response to treatment was 3.53 times higher in USpA patients compared to other patients (odds ratio =3.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.63–7.68, P=0.001). In 69.4% of the participants, the highest response to sulfasalazine was found, which was related to the underlying USpA. This study found that an adequate response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with ILBP was potentially increased by adding sulfasalazine. Thus, the observed response rate was dependent on the nature of underlying spondyloarthropathy.

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          Most cited references 23

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          New criteria for inflammatory back pain in patients with chronic back pain: a real patient exercise by experts from the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS).

          Inflammatory back pain (IBP) is an important clinical symptom in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA), and relevant for classification and diagnosis. In the present report, a new approach for the development of IBP classification criteria is discussed. Rheumatologists (n = 13) who are experts in SpA took part in a 2-day international workshop to investigate 20 patients with back pain and possible SpA. Each expert documented the presence/absence of clinical parameters typical for IBP, and judged whether IBP was considered present or absent based on the received information. This expert judgement was used as the dependent variable in a logistic regression analysis in order to identify those individual IBP parameters that contributed best to a diagnosis of IBP. The new set of IBP criteria was validated in a separate cohort of patients (n = 648). Five parameters best explained IBP according to the experts. These were: (1) improvement with exercise (odds ratio (OR) 23.1); (2) pain at night (OR 20.4); (3) insidious onset (OR 12.7); (4) age at onset <40 years (OR 9.9); and (5) no improvement with rest (OR 7.7). If at least four out of these five parameters were fulfilled, the criteria had a sensitivity of 77.0% and specificity of 91.7% in the patients participating in the workshop, and 79.6% and 72.4%, respectively, in the validation cohort. This new approach with real patients defines a set of IBP definition criteria using overall expert judgement on IBP as the gold standard. The IBP experts' criteria are robust, easy to apply and have good face validity.
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            Effect and treatment of chronic pain in inflammatory arthritis.

             Yvonne Lee (2013)
            Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population.
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              Efficacy of sulfasalazine in patients with inflammatory back pain due to undifferentiated spondyloarthritis and early ankylosing spondylitis: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

              To assess the effect of sulfasalazine (SSZ) on inflammatory back pain (IBP) due to active undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA) or ankylosing spondylitis in patients with symptom duration 3 from 12 centres were randomly assigned to 24 weeks' treatment with SSZ 2 g/day or placebo. The primary outcome variable was the change in BASDAI over 6 months. Secondary outcomes included measures of spinal pain, physical function and inflammation. 230 patients (50% men, age range 18-64 years, 67% human leucocyte antigen B27 positive) were treated with either SSZ 2x1 g/day or placebo for 6 months. Enthesitis was found in 50%, and peripheral arthritis in 47% of the patients. The mean (SD) BASDAI dropped markedly in both groups: by 3.7 (2.7) and 3.8 (2.4), respectively, as did most secondary outcome measures. No noticeable difference in treatment was observed between groups. Patients with IBP and no peripheral arthritis had significantly (p = 0.03) more benefit with SSZ (BASDAI 5.1 (1.3) to 2.8 (2.3)) than with placebo (5.2 (1.6) to 3.8 (2.4)). Spinal pain (p = 0.03) and morning stiffness (p = 0.05) improved with SSZ in these patients, but other secondary outcomes were not markedly different. SSZ was no better than placebo for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of uSpA; however, SSZ was more effective than placebo in the subgroup of patients with IBP and no peripheral arthritis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2016
                23 September 2016
                : 10
                : 3065-3069
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Research Development Unit (CRDU)
                [2 ]Clinical Research Development Unit (CRDU), Kowsar Hospital
                [3 ]Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
                [4 ]Nursing Care Research Center, Student Research Committee, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Daryoush Pahlevan, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, No 6, Abouzar St, Moalem Sq, Semnan City, Semnan Province, Iran Postal code: 241, Tel/fax +98 23 33654177, Email pahlevan.da@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                dddt-10-3065
                10.2147/DDDT.S111568
                5042186
                27729768
                © 2016 Moghimi et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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