Blog
About

13
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Environmental DNA from Seawater Samples Correlate with Trawl Catches of Subarctic, Deepwater Fishes

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Remote polar and deepwater fish faunas are under pressure from ongoing climate change and increasing fishing effort. However, these fish communities are difficult to monitor for logistic and financial reasons. Currently, monitoring of marine fishes largely relies on invasive techniques such as bottom trawling, and on official reporting of global catches, which can be unreliable. Thus, there is need for alternative and non-invasive techniques for qualitative and quantitative oceanic fish surveys. Here we report environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding of seawater samples from continental slope depths in Southwest Greenland. We collected seawater samples at depths of 188–918 m and compared seawater eDNA to catch data from trawling. We used Illumina sequencing of PCR products to demonstrate that eDNA reads show equivalence to fishing catch data obtained from trawling. Twenty-six families were found with both trawling and eDNA, while three families were found only with eDNA and two families were found only with trawling. Key commercial fish species for Greenland were the most abundant species in both eDNA reads and biomass catch, and interpolation of eDNA abundances between sampling sites showed good correspondence with catch sizes. Environmental DNA sequence reads from the fish assemblages correlated with biomass and abundance data obtained from trawling. Interestingly, the Greenland shark ( Somniosus microcephalus) showed high abundance of eDNA reads despite only a single specimen being caught, demonstrating the relevance of the eDNA approach for large species that can probably avoid bottom trawls in most cases. Quantitative detection of marine fish using eDNA remains to be tested further to ascertain whether this technique is able to yield credible results for routine application in fisheries. Nevertheless, our study demonstrates that eDNA reads can be used as a qualitative and quantitative proxy for marine fish assemblages in deepwater oceanic habitats. This relates directly to applied fisheries as well as to monitoring effects of ongoing climate change on marine biodiversity—especially in polar ecosystems.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Historical overfishing and the recent collapse of coastal ecosystems.

          Ecological extinction caused by overfishing precedes all other pervasive human disturbance to coastal ecosystems, including pollution, degradation of water quality, and anthropogenic climate change. Historical abundances of large consumer species were fantastically large in comparison with recent observations. Paleoecological, archaeological, and historical data show that time lags of decades to centuries occurred between the onset of overfishing and consequent changes in ecological communities, because unfished species of similar trophic level assumed the ecological roles of overfished species until they too were overfished or died of epidemic diseases related to overcrowding. Retrospective data not only help to clarify underlying causes and rates of ecological change, but they also demonstrate achievable goals for restoration and management of coastal ecosystems that could not even be contemplated based on the limited perspective of recent observations alone.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A global map of human impact on marine ecosystems.

            The management and conservation of the world's oceans require synthesis of spatial data on the distribution and intensity of human activities and the overlap of their impacts on marine ecosystems. We developed an ecosystem-specific, multiscale spatial model to synthesize 17 global data sets of anthropogenic drivers of ecological change for 20 marine ecosystems. Our analysis indicates that no area is unaffected by human influence and that a large fraction (41%) is strongly affected by multiple drivers. However, large areas of relatively little human impact remain, particularly near the poles. The analytical process and resulting maps provide flexible tools for regional and global efforts to allocate conservation resources; to implement ecosystem-based management; and to inform marine spatial planning, education, and basic research.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Towards sustainability in world fisheries.

              Fisheries have rarely been 'sustainable'. Rather, fishing has induced serial depletions, long masked by improved technology, geographic expansion and exploitation of previously spurned species lower in the food web. With global catches declining since the late 1980s, continuation of present trends will lead to supply shortfall, for which aquaculture cannot be expected to compensate, and may well exacerbate. Reducing fishing capacity to appropriate levels will require strong reductions of subsidies. Zoning the oceans into unfished marine reserves and areas with limited levels of fishing effort would allow sustainable fisheries, based on resources embedded in functional, diverse ecosystems.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                16 November 2016
                2016
                : 11
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
                [2 ]Section for EvoGenomics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
                [3 ]Technical University of Denmark, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark
                [4 ]Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland
                [5 ]Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
                [6 ]Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom
                Central Michigan University, UNITED STATES
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                • Conceptualization: PFT PRM OAJ EW.

                • Data curation: PFT PRM OAJ EES.

                • Formal analysis: PFT PRM OAJ EES SWK.

                • Funding acquisition: PFT PRM OAJ EW.

                • Investigation: PFT PRM OAJ.

                • Methodology: PFT PRM OAJ.

                • Project administration: PFT PRM OAJ EW.

                • Resources: PFT PRM OAJ EES SWK EW.

                • Software: PFT EES SWK.

                • Supervision: PFT PRM OAJ EW.

                • Validation: PFT PRM EES SWK.

                • Visualization: PFT PRM EES SWK.

                • Writing – original draft: PFT PRM OAJ.

                • Writing – review & editing: PFT PRM OAJ EW EES SWK.

                PONE-D-16-27987
                10.1371/journal.pone.0165252
                5112899
                27851757
                © 2016 Thomsen et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Counts
                Figures: 6, Tables: 1, Pages: 22
                Product
                Funding
                Danish National Research Foundation funded the work. Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Greenland Self-government, Department for education and research funded the work. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Animals
                Vertebrates
                Fishes
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Molecular Biology
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Artificial Gene Amplification and Extension
                Polymerase Chain Reaction
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Artificial Gene Amplification and Extension
                Polymerase Chain Reaction
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Animals
                Vertebrates
                Fishes
                Marine Fish
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Marine Biology
                Marine Fish
                Earth Sciences
                Marine and Aquatic Sciences
                Marine Biology
                Marine Fish
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Database and Informatics Methods
                Biological Databases
                Sequence Databases
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Molecular Biology
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Sequencing Techniques
                Sequence Analysis
                Sequence Databases
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Molecular Biology Techniques
                Sequencing Techniques
                Sequence Analysis
                Sequence Databases
                Earth Sciences
                Hydrology
                Sea Water
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Taxonomy
                Computer and Information Sciences
                Data Management
                Taxonomy
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Animals
                Vertebrates
                Fishes
                Chondrichthyes
                Elasmobranchii
                Sharks
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Agriculture
                Fisheries
                Custom metadata
                Illumina MiSeq raw sequence data are available from the Dryad Digital Repository ( http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ch576). Full sequences for reference Greenlandic fish species generated from tissue samples have been added to Genbank (NCBI Accession no. KX929879-KX929923).

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article