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      Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

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          Abstract

          In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides analysis and retrieval resources for the data in GenBank and other biological data available through NCBI's web site. NCBI resources include Entrez, the Entrez Programming Utilities, My NCBI, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link, Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, Splign, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genome, Genome Project and related tools, the Trace, Assembly, and Short Read Archives, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Influenza Viral Resources, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, Gene Expression Omnibus, Entrez Probe, GENSAT, Database of Genotype and Phenotype, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals, the Molecular Modeling Database, the Conserved Domain Database, the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool and the PubChem suite of small molecule databases. Augmenting the web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. These resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

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          Most cited references 34

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          BLAST 2 Sequences, a new tool for comparing protein and nucleotide sequences.

          'BLAST 2 Sequences', a new BLAST-based tool for aligning two protein or nucleotide sequences, is described. While the standard BLAST program is widely used to search for homologous sequences in nucleotide and protein databases, one often needs to compare only two sequences that are already known to be homologous, coming from related species or, e.g. different isolates of the same virus. In such cases searching the entire database would be unnecessarily time-consuming. 'BLAST 2 Sequences' utilizes the BLAST algorithm for pairwise DNA-DNA or protein-protein sequence comparison. A World Wide Web version of the program can be used interactively at the NCBI WWW site (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gorf/bl2.++ +html). The resulting alignments are presented in both graphical and text form. The variants of the program for PC (Windows), Mac and several UNIX-based platforms can be downloaded from the NCBI FTP site (ftp://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).
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            Open mass spectrometry search algorithm.

            Large numbers of MS/MS peptide spectra generated in proteomics experiments require efficient, sensitive and specific algorithms for peptide identification. In the Open Mass Spectrometry Search Algorithm (OMSSA), specificity is calculated by a classic probability score using an explicit model for matching experimental spectra to sequences. At default thresholds, OMSSA matches more spectra from a standard protein cocktail than a comparable algorithm. OMSSA is designed to be faster than published algorithms in searching large MS/MS datasets.
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              PatternHunter: faster and more sensitive homology search.

               B. Ma,  J. Tromp,  M. Li (2002)
              Genomics and proteomics studies routinely depend on homology searches based on the strategy of finding short seed matches which are then extended. The exploding genomic data growth presents a dilemma for DNA homology search techniques: increasing seed size decreases sensitivity whereas decreasing seed size slows down computation. We present a new homology search algorithm 'PatternHunter' that uses a novel seed model for increased sensitivity and new hit-processing techniques for significantly increased speed. At Blast levels of sensitivity, PatternHunter is able to find homologies between sequences as large as human chromosomes, in mere hours on a desktop. PatternHunter is available at http://www.bioinformaticssolutions.com, as a commercial package. It runs on all platforms that support Java. PatternHunter technology is being patented; commercial use requires a license from BSI, while non-commercial use will be free.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                January 2008
                27 November 2007
                27 November 2007
                : 36
                : Database issue , Database issue
                : D13-D21
                Affiliations
                National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Building 38A, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed.+1 301 496 2475+1 301 480 9241 wheeler@ 123456ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkm1000
                2238880
                18045790
                © 2007 The Author(s)

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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