182
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    5
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 2 , 7 , 1 , 4 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 9 , 2 , 1 , 1 , 1 , 3 , 3 , 4 , 11 , 11 , 4 , 12 , 12 , 5 , 6 , 5 , 13 , 14 , 13 , 14 , 13 , 13 , 15 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 17 , 1 , 1 , 1 , 2 , 4 , 9 , 10 , 9 , 10 , 9 , 18 , 19 , 5 , 19 , 19 , 20 , 4 , 5 , 21 , 5 , 22 , 23 , 23 , 24 , 25 , 25 , 25 , 26 , 27 , 27 , 1 , 28 , 1 , 2 , 29 , 1 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 2 , 4 , 2 , 13 , 14 , 15 , E.
      Science
      American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Framework for Change

          Organic aerosols make up 20 to 90% of the particulate mass of the troposphere and are important factors in both climate and human heath. However, their sources and removal pathways are very uncertain, and their atmospheric evolution is poorly characterized. Jimenez et al. (p. [Related article:]1525 ; see the Perspective by [Related article:]Andreae ) present an integrated framework of organic aerosol compositional evolution in the atmosphere, based on model results and field and laboratory data that simulate the dynamic aging behavior of organic aerosols. Particles become more oxidized, more hygroscopic, and less volatile with age, as they become oxygenated organic aerosols. These results should lead to better predictions of climate and air quality.

          Abstract

          Organic aerosols are not compositionally static, but they evolve dramatically within hours to days of their formation.

          Abstract

          Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework describing the atmospheric evolution of OA that is constrained by high–time-resolution measurements of its composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), with concentrations comparable to those of sulfate aerosol throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Our model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in both the atmosphere and laboratory: It can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

          Related collections

          Most cited references30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Ubiquity and dominance of oxygenated species in organic aerosols in anthropogenically-influenced Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Chemical and microphysical characterization of ambient aerosols with the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer.

            The application of mass spectrometric techniques to the real-time measurement and characterization of aerosols represents a significant advance in the field of atmospheric science. This review focuses on the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), an instrument designed and developed at Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) that is the most widely used thermal vaporization AMS. The AMS uses aerodynamic lens inlet technology together with thermal vaporization and electron-impact mass spectrometry to measure the real-time non-refractory (NR) chemical speciation and mass loading as a function of particle size of fine aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between approximately 50 and 1,000 nm. The original AMS utilizes a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Q) with electron impact (EI) ionization and produces ensemble average data of particle properties. Later versions employ time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometers and can produce full mass spectral data for single particles. This manuscript presents a detailed discussion of the strengths and limitations of the AMS measurement approach and reviews how the measurements are used to characterize particle properties. Results from selected laboratory experiments and field measurement campaigns are also presented to highlight the different applications of this instrument. Recent instrumental developments, such as the incorporation of softer ionization techniques (vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photo-ionization, Li+ ion, and electron attachment) and high-resolution ToF mass spectrometers, that yield more detailed information about the organic aerosol component are also described. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The formation, properties and impact of secondary organic aerosol: current and emerging issues

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                0036-8075
                1095-9203
                December 11 2009
                December 11 2009
                : 326
                : 5959
                : 1525-1529
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA.
                [2 ]Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA, USA.
                [3 ]Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
                [4 ]Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland,
                [5 ]Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York, Albany, NY, USA.
                [6 ]Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
                [7 ]Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.
                [8 ]Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA.
                [9 ]School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK.
                [10 ]National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK.
                [11 ]Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA.
                [12 ]Empa, Laboratory for Air Pollution/Environmental Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
                [13 ]Department of Physics, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
                [14 ]Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
                [15 ]Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
                [16 ]Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
                [17 ]Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
                [18 ]Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
                [19 ]Department of Particle Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany.
                [20 ]Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
                [21 ]Empa, Laboratory for Internal Combustion Engines, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
                [22 ]Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Mexico.
                [23 ]Climate Change Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, USA.
                [24 ]Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA.
                [25 ]Asian Environmental Research Group, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan.
                [26 ]Sanyu Plant Service, Sagamihara, Japan.
                [27 ]Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China.
                [28 ]Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA.
                [29 ]Tofwerk, Thun, Switzerland.
                Article
                10.1126/science.1180353
                20007897
                40acff30-bfbd-4394-9c55-1e32067d571b
                © 2009
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article