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      Heterotrimeric G proteins promote FLS2 protein accumulation through inhibition of FLS2 autophagic degradation

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      bioRxiv

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          ABSTRACT

          FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2) is a plant immune receptor that binds bacterial flagellin to activate immune signaling. This immune signal is transduced by a heterotrimeric G protein complex at the plasma membrane and activates downstream signaling. However, it is unknown whether the heterotrimeric G proteins have functions at other subcellular locations away from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that components of the heterotrimeric G protein complex stabilize FLS2 protein levels by inhibiting the autophagic degradation of FLS2. Using genetic analysis, we determined that mutations of G protein components resulted in reduced immune signaling in part due to decreased FLS2 protein levels. Furthermore, reduction of FLS2 protein levels was caused by elevated proteasomal and autophagic degradation of FLS2. Genetic inhibition of autophagy in G protein mutants rescued FLS2 levels and immunity. Our findings suggest that the heterotrimeric G protein components, in addition to being part of the heterotrimeric G protein complex that transduces signals at the plasma membrane, also function away from the plasma membrane to control FLS2 protein levels. These results expand the functional capacity of the heterotrimeric G protein complexes in plant immunity.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          bioRxiv
          October 08 2018
          Article
          10.1101/438135
          © 2018
          Product

          Quantitative & Systems biology, Plant science & Botany

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