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      Assessment of myocardial perfusion and function with PET and PET/CT

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          Most cited references 108

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          Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography using 64-slice spiral computed tomography.

          The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography using a new 64-slice scanner. The new 64-slice MSCT scanner has improved spatial resolution of 0.4 mm and a faster rotation time (330 ms) compared to prior MSCT scanners. We studied 70 consecutive patients undergoing elective invasive coronary angiography. Patients were excluded for atrial fibrillation, but not for high heart rate, coronary calcification, or obesity. All vessels were analyzed, including those 70 beats/min, and 50% were obese. Specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values for the presence of significant stenoses were: by segment (n = 935), 86%, 95%, 66%, and 98%, respectively; by artery (n = 279), 91%, 92%, 80%, and 97%, respectively; by patient (n = 70), 95%, 90%, 93%, and 93%, respectively. Our results indicate high quantitative and qualitative diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MSCT in comparison to QCA in a broad spectrum of patients.
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            Radiation dose to patients from cardiac diagnostic imaging.

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              Coronary microvascular dysfunction and prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

              Microvascular dysfunction, reflected by an inadequate increase in myocardial blood flow in response to dipyridamole infusion, is a recognized feature of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Its long-term effect on the prognosis is unknown. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after they had undergone quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow by positron-emission tomography (PET). Fifty-one patients (New York Heart Association class I or II) were followed for a mean (+/-SD) of 8.1+/-2.1 years after PET. Twelve subjects with atypical chest pain served as controls. Measurement of flow was performed at base line and after the infusion of the coronary vasodilator dipyridamole, with the use of nitrogen-13-labeled ammonia. Patients were then divided into three equal groups with increasing values of myocardial blood flow. The response of myocardial blood flow to dipyridamole was severely blunted in the patients, as compared with the controls (1.50+/-0.69 vs. 2.71+/-0.94 ml per minute per gram of tissue, P<0.001). Sixteen patients (31 percent) had an unfavorable outcome (death from cardiovascular causes, progression to New York Heart Association class III or IV, or sustained ventricular arrhythmias requiring the implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator) 2.2 to 9.1 years after PET. Reduced blood flow in response to dipyridamole was strongly associated with an unfavorable outcome. Multivariate analysis showed that among patients in the lowest of the three flow groups the age-adjusted relative hazard of death from cardiovascular causes was 9.6 (P=0.02) and the relative hazard of an unfavorable outcome (a combined end point) was 20.1 (P=0.003), as compared with patients in the two other flow groups. Specifically, all four patients who died from heart failure and three of five who died suddenly were in this subgroup. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the degree of microvascular dysfunction is a strong, independent predictor of clinical deterioration and death. Severe microvascular dysfunction is often present in patients with mild or no symptoms and may precede clinical deterioration by years. Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
                J. Nucl. Cardiol.
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1071-3581
                1532-6551
                June 2010
                April 9 2010
                June 2010
                : 17
                : 3
                : 498-513
                Article
                10.1007/s12350-010-9223-5
                © 2010

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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