57
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      An ER-mitochondria tethering complex revealed by a synthetic biology screen.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Animals, Calcium Signaling, genetics, Endoplasmic Reticulum, physiology, Membrane Proteins, metabolism, Mice, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Proteins, Phospholipids, biosynthesis, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Communication between organelles is an important feature of all eukaryotic cells. To uncover components involved in mitochondria/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) junctions, we screened for mutants that could be complemented by a synthetic protein designed to artificially tether the two organelles. We identified the Mmm1/Mdm10/Mdm12/Mdm34 complex as a molecular tether between ER and mitochondria. The tethering complex was composed of proteins resident of both ER and mitochondria. With the use of genome-wide mapping of genetic interactions, we showed that the components of the tethering complex were functionally connected to phospholipid biosynthesis and calcium-signaling genes. In mutant cells, phospholipid biosynthesis was impaired. The tethering complex localized to discrete foci, suggesting that discrete sites of close apposition between ER and mitochondria facilitate interorganelle calcium and phospholipid exchange.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Microdomains with high Ca2+ close to IP3-sensitive channels that are sensed by neighboring mitochondria.

          Microdomains of high intracellular calcium ion concentration, [Ca2+]i, have been hypothesized to occur in living cells exposed to stimuli that generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Mitochondrially targeted recombinant aequorin was used to show that IP3-induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores caused increases of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]m, the speed and amplitude of which are not accounted for by the relatively small increases in mean [Ca2+]i. A similar response was obtained by the addition of IP3 to permeabilized cells but not by perfusion of cells with Ca2+ at concentrations similar to those measured in intact cells. It is concluded that in vivo, domains of high [Ca2+]i are transiently generated close to IP3-gated channels and sensed by nearby mitochondria; this may provide an efficient mechanism for optimizing mitochondrial activity upon cell stimulation.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Rapid changes of mitochondrial Ca2+ revealed by specifically targeted recombinant aequorin.

            Introduction of Ca2+ indicators (photoproteins, fluorescent dyes) that can be trapped in the cytosolic compartment of living cells has yielded major advances in our knowledge of Ca2+ homeostasis. Ca2+ however regulates functions not only in the cytosol but also within various organelles where indicators have not yet been specifically targeted. Here we present a novel procedure by which the free Ca2+ concentration of mitochondria, [Ca2+]m, can be monitored continuously at rest and during stimulation. The complementary DNA for the Ca2+ sensitive photoprotein aequorin was fused in frame with that encoding a mitochondrial presequence. The hybrid cDNA was transfected into bovine endothelial cells and stable clones were obtained expressing variable amounts of mitochondrially targeted apoaequorin. The functional photoprotein could be reconstituted in intact cells by incubation with purified coelenterazine and [Ca2+]m could thus be monitored in situ. This allowed the unprecedented direct demonstration that agonist-stimulated elevations of cytosolic free Ca2+, [Ca2+]i, (measured in parallel with Fura-2) evoke rapid and transient increases of [Ca2+]m, which can be prevented by pretreatment with a mitochondrial uncoupler. The possibility of targeting aequorin to cellular organelles not only offers a new and powerful method for studying aspects of Ca2+ homeostasis that up to now could not be directly approached, but might also be used in the future as a tool to report in situ a variety of apparently unrelated phenomena of wide biological interest.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Dissecting membrane insertion of mitochondrial beta-barrel proteins.

              Communication of mitochondria with the rest of the cell requires beta-barrel proteins of the outer membrane. All beta-barrel proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and imported into mitochondria by the general translocase TOM and the sorting machinery SAM. The SAM complex contains two proteins essential for cell viability, the channel-forming Sam50 and Sam35. We have identified the sorting signal of mitochondrial beta-barrel proteins that is universal in all eukaryotic kingdoms. The beta-signal initiates precursor insertion into a hydrophilic, proteinaceous membrane environment by forming a ternary complex with Sam35 and Sam50. Sam35 recognizes the beta-signal, inducing a major conductance increase of the Sam50 channel. Subsequent precursor release from SAM is coupled to integration into the lipid phase. We propose that a two-stage mechanism of signal-driven insertion into a membrane protein complex and subsequent integration into the lipid phase may represent a general mechanism for biogenesis of beta-barrel proteins.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                19556461
                2933203
                10.1126/science.1175088

                Comments

                Comment on this article