Blog
About

18
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension in China

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and distribution of hypertension and to determine the status of hypertension awareness, treatment, and control in the general adult population in China. The International Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Disease in ASIA (InterASIA), conducted in 2000-2001, used a multistage cluster sampling method to select a nationally representative sample. A total of 15 540 adults, age 35 to 74 years, were examined. Three blood pressure measurements were obtained by trained observers by use of a standardized mercury sphygmomanometer after a 5-minute sitting rest. Information on history of hypertension and use of antihypertensive medications was obtained by use of a standard questionnaire. Hypertension was defined as a mean systolic blood pressure > or =140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure > or =90 mm Hg, and/or use of antihypertensive medications. Overall, 27.2% of the Chinese adult population age 35 to 74 years, representing 129 824 000 persons, had hypertension. The age-specific prevalence of hypertension was 17.4%, 28.2%, 40.7%, and 47.3% in men and 10.7%, 26.8%, 38.9%, and 50.2% in women age 35 to 44 years, 45 to 54 years, 55 to 64 years, and 65 to 74 years, respectively. Among hypertensive patients, only 44.7% were aware of their high blood pressure, 28.2% were taking antihypertensive medication, and 8.1% achieved blood pressure control (<140/90 mm Hg). Our results indicate that hypertension is highly prevalent in China. The percentages of those with hypertension who are aware, treated, and controlled are unacceptably low. These results underscore the urgent need to develop national strategies to improve prevention, detection, and treatment of hypertension in China.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 19

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Blood pressure and end-stage renal disease in men.

          End-stage renal disease in the United States creates a large burden for both individuals and society as a whole. Efforts to prevent the condition require an understanding of modifiable risk factors. We assessed the development of end-stage renal disease through 1990 in 332,544 men, 35 to 57 years of age, who were screened between 1973 and 1975 for entry into the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT). We used data from the national registry for treated end-stage renal disease of the Health Care Financing Administration and from records on death from renal disease from the National Death Index and the Social Security Administration. During an average of 16 years of follow-up, 814 subjects either died of end-stage renal disease or were treated for that condition (15.6 cases per 100,000 person-years of observation). A strong, graded relation between both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and end-stage renal disease was identified, independent of associations between the disease and age, race, income, use of medication for diabetes mellitus, history of myocardial infarction, serum cholesterol concentration, and cigarette smoking. As compared with men with an optimal level of blood pressure (systolic pressure or = 210 mm Hg or diastolic pressure > or = 120 mm Hg) was 22.1 (P < 0.001). These relations were not due to end-stage renal disease that occurred soon after screening and, in the 12,866 screened men who entered the MRFIT study, were not changed by taking into account the base-line serum creatinine concentration and urinary protein excretion. The estimated risk of end-stage renal disease associated with elevations of systolic pressure was greater than that linked with elevations of diastolic pressure when both variables were considered together. Elevations of blood pressure are a strong independent risk factor for end-stage renal disease; interventions to prevent the disease need to emphasize the prevention and control of both high-normal and high blood pressure.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Blood pressure, cholesterol, and stroke in eastern Asia

              (1998)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Elevated systolic blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular and renal disease: overview of evidence from observational epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled trials.

              The effect of elevated blood pressure on risk of cardiovascular and renal disease has been documented in both observational epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. However, these studies have traditionally concentrated on diastolic blood pressure to characterize the risk associated with hypertension. We reviewed evidence from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials to quantify the risk associated with systolic blood pressure. Prospective studies and randomized controlled clinical trials that were published in English-language journals were retrieved using MEDLINE, bibliographies, and the authors' reference files. All retrieved publications were reviewed and information on sample size, duration, study design, antihypertensive medication, participant characteristics, and outcomes was abstracted for randomized controlled trials that reported systolic blood pressure reduction during intervention. Several prospective studies indicate that the association between systolic blood pressure and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and end-stage renal disease is continuous, graded, and independent. Furthermore, they suggest that the association of systolic blood pressure with these outcomes is stronger than that of diastolic blood pressure. Pooling of the data available from randomized controlled trials indicates that an average reduction of 12 to 13 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure over 4 years of follow-up is associated with a 21% reduction in coronary heart disease, 37% reduction in stroke, 25% reduction in total cardiovascular mortality, and 13% reduction in all-cause mortality rates. These data indicate that systolic blood pressure is an independent and strong predictor for risk of cardiovascular and renal disease.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Hypertension
                Hypertension
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0194-911X
                1524-4563
                December 2002
                December 2002
                : 40
                : 6
                : 920-927
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College (D.G., X.W., X.D., G.H., S.S.), Beijing, China; School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (K.R., P.M., P.K.W., J.H.) and School of Medicine (J.C., P.K.W., J.H.), Tulane University, New Orleans, La; and Pfizer Inc (R.F.R.), New York, NY.
                Article
                10.1161/01.HYP.0000040263.94619.D5
                12468580
                © 2002

                Comments

                Comment on this article