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      ACG Clinical Guideline : Ulcerative Colitis in Adults

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          Abstract

          Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder. These guidelines indicate the preferred approach to the management of adults with UC and represent the official practice recommendations of the American College of Gastroenterology. The scientific evidence for these guidelines was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. In instances where the evidence was not appropriate for GRADE, but there was consensus of significant clinical merit, "key concept" statements were developed using expert consensus. These guidelines are meant to be broadly applicable and should be viewed as the preferred, but not only, approach to clinical scenarios.

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          Most cited references 211

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          Infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis.

          Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha, is an established treatment for Crohn's disease but not ulcerative colitis. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies--the Active Ulcerative Colitis Trials 1 and 2 (ACT 1 and ACT 2, respectively)--evaluated the efficacy of infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy in adults with ulcerative colitis. In each study, 364 patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis despite treatment with concurrent medications received placebo or infliximab (5 mg or 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) intravenously at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and then every eight weeks through week 46 (in ACT 1) or week 22 (in ACT 2). Patients were followed for 54 weeks in ACT 1 and 30 weeks in ACT 2. In ACT 1, 69 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 61 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 37 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). A response was defined as a decrease in the Mayo score of at least 3 points and at least 30 percent, with an accompanying decrease in the subscore for rectal bleeding of at least 1 point or an absolute rectal-bleeding subscore of 0 or 1. In ACT 2, 64 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 69 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 29 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). In both studies, patients who received infliximab were more likely to have a clinical response at week 30 (P< or =0.002 for all comparisons). In ACT 1, more patients who received 5 mg or 10 mg of infliximab had a clinical response at week 54 (45 percent and 44 percent, respectively) than did those who received placebo (20 percent, P<0.001 for both comparisons). Patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every eight weeks thereafter were more likely to have a clinical response at weeks 8, 30, and 54 than were those receiving placebo. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00036439 and NCT00096655.) Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
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            Is Open Access

            Toward an Integrated Clinical, Molecular and Serological Classification of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Report of a Working Party of the 2005 Montreal World Congress of Gastroenterology

            The discovery of a series of genetic and serological markers associated with disease susceptibility and phenotype in inflammatory bowel disease has led to the prospect of an integrated classification system involving clinical, serological and genetic parameters. The Working Party has reviewed current clinical classification systems in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and indeterminate colitis, and provided recommendations for clinical classification in practice. Progress with respect to integrating serological and genetic markers has been examined in detail, and the implications are discussed. While an integrated system is not proposed for clinical use at present, the introduction of a widely acceptable clinical subclassification is strongly advocated, which would allow detailed correlations among serotype, genotype and clinical phenotype to be examined and confirmed in independent cohorts of patients and, thereby, provide a vital foundation for future work.
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              Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Induces Remission in Patients With Active Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

              Ulcerative colitis (UC) is difficult to treat, and standard therapy does not always induce remission. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative approach that induced remission in small series of patients with active UC. We investigated its safety and efficacy in a placebo-controlled randomized trial.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The American Journal of Gastroenterology
                The American Journal of Gastroenterology
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0002-9270
                2019
                March 2019
                : 114
                : 3
                : 384-413
                Article
                10.14309/ajg.0000000000000152
                30840605
                © 2019

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