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      Sub-diffraction-limit imaging by stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)

      , ,

      Nature Methods

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          We have developed a high-resolution fluorescence microscopy method based on high-accuracy localization of photoswitchable fluorophores. In each imaging cycle, only a fraction of the fluorophores were turned on, allowing their positions to be determined with nanometer accuracy. The fluorophore positions obtained from a series of imaging cycles were used to reconstruct the overall image. We demonstrated an imaging resolution of 20 nm. This technique can, in principle, reach molecular-scale resolution.

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          Most cited references 10

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          Nonlinear structured-illumination microscopy: wide-field fluorescence imaging with theoretically unlimited resolution.

           M. Gustafsson (2005)
          Contrary to the well known diffraction limit, the fluorescence microscope is in principle capable of unlimited resolution. The necessary elements are spatially structured illumination light and a nonlinear dependence of the fluorescence emission rate on the illumination intensity. As an example of this concept, this article experimentally demonstrates saturated structured-illumination microscopy, a recently proposed method in which the nonlinearity arises from saturation of the excited state. This method can be used in a simple, wide-field (nonscanning) microscope, uses only a single, inexpensive laser, and requires no unusual photophysical properties of the fluorophore. The practical resolving power is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio, which in turn is limited by photobleaching. Experimental results show that a 2D point resolution of <50 nm is possible on sufficiently bright and photostable samples.
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            Myosin V walks hand-over-hand: single fluorophore imaging with 1.5-nm localization.

            Myosin V is a dimeric molecular motor that moves processively on actin, with the center of mass moving approximately 37 nanometers for each adenosine triphosphate hydrolyzed. We have labeled myosin V with a single fluorophore at different positions in the light-chain domain and measured the step size with a standard deviation of <1.5 nanometers, with 0.5-second temporal resolution, and observation times of minutes. The step size alternates between 37 + 2x nm and 37 - 2x, where x is the distance along the direction of motion between the dye and the midpoint between the two heads. These results strongly support a hand-over-hand model of motility, not an inchworm model.
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              Toward fluorescence nanoscopy.

               Stefan Hell (2003)
              For more than a century, the resolution of focusing light microscopy has been limited by diffraction to 180 nm in the focal plane and to 500 nm along the optic axis. Recently, microscopes have been reported that provide three- to sevenfold improved axial resolution in live cells. Moreover, a family of concepts has emerged that overcomes the diffraction barrier altogether. Its first exponent, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, has so far displayed a resolution down to 28 nm. Relying on saturated optical transitions, these concepts are limited only by the attainable saturation level. As strong saturation should be feasible at low light intensities, nanoscale imaging with focused light may be closer than ever.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Methods
                Nat Methods
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1548-7091
                1548-7105
                October 2006
                August 9 2006
                October 2006
                : 3
                : 10
                : 793-796
                Article
                10.1038/nmeth929
                2700296
                16896339
                © 2006

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