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      Āwhina Revolution: A Bayesian Analysis of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Completion Rates from a Program for Māori and Pacific Success in STEM Disciplines

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          Abstract

          Te Rōpū Āwhina (Āwhina), an equity initiative in a New Zealand university, aimed to produce Māori and Pacific science, technology, engineering, and mathematics professionals who contribute to Māori and Pacific community development and leadership. Standardized completion rates for 3-year undergraduate and 2-year postgraduate degree students were consistent with a positive Āwhina effect.

          Abstract

          Māori and Pacific students generally do not attain the same levels of tertiary success as New Zealanders of European descent, particularly in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects. Te Rōpū Āwhina (Āwhina), an equity initiative at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand between 1999 and 2015, aimed to produce Māori and Pacific professionals in STEM disciplines who contribute to Māori and Pacific community development and leadership. A hierarchical Bayesian approach was used to estimate posterior standardized completion rates for 3-year undergraduate and 2-year postgraduate degrees undertaken by non–Māori-Pacific and Māori-Pacific students. Results were consistent with an Āwhina effect, that is, Āwhina’s positive influence on (combined) Māori and Pacific success.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Monitoring Editor
                Journal
                CBE Life Sci Educ
                CBE Life Sci Educ
                CBE-LSE
                CBE-LSE
                lse
                CBE Life Sciences Education
                American Society for Cell Biology
                1931-7913
                Spring 2018
                : 17
                : 1
                Affiliations
                []Āwhina Research, Wellington 6012, New Zealand
                [§ ]School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
                [ǁ ]Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146
                []IMPAQ International, Washington, DC 20005
                [# ]School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
                Author notes

                The authors are listed alphabetically after the corresponding author.

                *Address correspondence to: Ken Richardson ( kenrichardson@ 123456gmx.com ).
                Article
                CBE.17-07-0117
                10.1187/cbe.17-07-0117
                6007770
                29449269
                © 2018 K. Richardson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2018 The American Society for Cell Biology. “ASCB®” and “The American Society for Cell Biology®” are registered trademarks of The American Society for Cell Biology.

                This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License.

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