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      Novel Form of Curcumin Improves Endothelial Function in Young, Healthy Individuals: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

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          Abstract

          Curcumin, a turmeric extract, may protect against cardiovascular diseases by enhancing endothelial function. In this randomized controlled double-blind parallel prospective study, fifty-nine healthy adults were assigned to placebo, 50 mg (50 mg), or 200 mg (200 mg) curcumin, for 8 weeks. The higher curcumin (200 mg) supplementation produced a dose-mediated improvement in endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The outcome was a clinically substantial 3.0% increase (90% CI 0.7 to 5.3%, p = 0.032; benefit : harm odds ratio 546 : 1) with the 200 mg dose, relative to placebo. The 50 mg dose also increased FMD relative to placebo by 1.7% (−0.6 to 4.0%, p = 0.23; 25 : 1), but the outcome was not clinically decisive. In apparently healthy adults, 8 weeks of 200 mg oral curcumin supplementation resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in endothelial function as measured by FMD. Oral curcumin supplementation may present a simple lifestyle strategy for decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. This trial was registered at ISRCTN registry ( ISRCTN90184217).

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          Guidelines for the ultrasound assessment of endothelial-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery

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            Sifting the evidence-what's wrong with significance tests?

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              Activation of transcription factor NF-kappa B is suppressed by curcumin (diferuloylmethane) [corrected].

              When activated, NF-kappa B, a ubiquitous transcription factor, binds DNA as a heterodimeric complex composed of members of the Rel/NF-kappa B family of polypeptides. Because of its intimate involvement in host defense against disease, this transcription factor is an important target for therapeutic intervention. In the present report we demonstrate that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a known anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic agent, is a potent inhibitor of NF-kappa B activation. Treatment of human myeloid ML-1a cells with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) rapidly activated NF-kappa B, which consists of p50 and p65 subunits, and this activation was inhibited by curcumin. AP-1 binding factors were also found to be down-modulated by curcumin, whereas the Sp1 binding factor was unaffected. Besides TNF, curcumin also blocked phorbol ester- and hydrogen peroxide-mediated activation of NF-kappa B. The TNF-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of I kappa B alpha was not observed in curcumin-treated cells; the translocation of p65 subunit to the nucleus was inhibited at the same time. The mechanism of action of curcumin was found to be different from that of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. Our results indicate that curcumin inhibits NF-kappa B activation pathway at a step before I kappa B alpha phosphorylation but after the convergence of various stimuli.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Nutr Metab
                J Nutr Metab
                JNME
                Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
                Hindawi Publishing Corporation
                2090-0724
                2090-0732
                2016
                17 August 2016
                : 2016
                : 1089653
                Affiliations
                1Department of Kinesiology, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 297730, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA
                2School of Sport and Exercise, Massey University, 63 Wallace Street, Wellington 6021, New Zealand
                3Increnovo LLC, 2138 E. Lafayette Place, Milwaukee, WI 53202, USA
                Author notes
                *Jonathan M. Oliver: jonathan.oliver@ 123456tcu.edu

                Academic Editor: Duo Li

                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2505-1977
                Article
                10.1155/2016/1089653
                5005531
                27630772
                4254850c-5174-448e-936b-092ae90f3995
                Copyright © 2016 Jonathan M. Oliver et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 28 April 2016
                : 27 June 2016
                : 17 July 2016
                Funding
                Funded by: OmniActive Health Technologies Ltd.
                Categories
                Clinical Study

                Nutrition & Dietetics
                Nutrition & Dietetics

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