Blog
About

7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Black hole, string ball, and \(p\)-brane production at hadronic supercolliders

      Preprint

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In models of large extra dimensions, the string and Planck scales become accessible at future colliders. When the energy scale is above the string scale or Planck scale a number of interesting phenomena occur, namely, production of stringy states, \(p\)-branes, string balls, black hole, etc. In this Proceedings, we summarize a recent work \cite{me0} on the production of black holes, string balls, and \(p\)-branes at hadronic supercolliders, and discuss their signatures.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Black Holes at the LHC

          If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, the LHC will be producing one black hole (BH) about every second. The BH decays into prompt, hard photons and charged leptons is a clean signature with low background. The absence of significant missing energy allows the reconstruction of the mass of the decaying BH. The correlation between the BH mass and its temperature, deduced from the energy spectrum of the decay products, can test experimentally the higher dimensional Hawking evaporation law. It can also determine the number of large new dimensions and the scale of quantum gravity.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Black Holes Radiate Mainly on the Brane

            We examine the evaporation of a small black hole on a brane in a world with large extra dimensions. Since the masses of many Kaluza-Klein modes are much smaller than the Hawking temperature of the black hole, it has been claimed that most of the energy is radiated into these modes. We show that this is incorrect. Most of the energy goes into the modes on the brane. This raises the possibility of observing Hawking radiation in future high energy colliders if there are large extra dimensions.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Light Gluino, Light Bottom Squark Scenario, and LEP Predictions

              The scenario of light gluinos and light sbottoms was advocated to explain the discrepancy between the measured and theoretical production of \(b\) quarks at the Tevatron. This scenario will have model-independent predictions for \(Z\to q\bar q \tilde{g} \tilde{g}\) at the \(Z^0\)-pole, and \(e^+ e^- \to q\bar q \tilde{g} \tilde{g}\) at LEPII. We show that the data for \(Z\to q \bar q g^* \to q\bar q b \bar b\) at LEPI cannot constrain the scenario, because the ratio \(\Gamma(Z \to q\bar q \tilde{g} \tilde{g})/ \Gamma(Z \to q \bar q g^* \to q\bar q b \bar b) = 0.15 - 0.04\) for \(m_{\tilde{g}}= 12-16\) GeV is smaller than the uncertainty of the data. However, at LEPII the ratio \(\sigma(e^+ e^- \to q\bar q \tilde{g} \tilde{g})/ \sigma(e^+ e^- \to q \bar q g^* \to q\bar q b \bar b) \simeq 0.4 - 0.2\) for \(m_{\tilde{g}}= 12-16\) GeV, which may give an observable excess in \(q\bar q b\bar b\) events; especially, the \(4b\) events.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                17 October 2002
                2002-10-19
                Article
                hep-ph/0210242
                Custom metadata
                NSC-NCTS-021017
                7 pages, talk presented in the SUSY02, DESY, Hambury, June 2002, references added
                hep-ph

                Comments

                Comment on this article