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      Manipulating Mindfulness Benefits Creative Elaboration at High Levels of Neuroticism

      1 , 1 , 1 , 1

      Empirical Studies of the Arts

      Baywood Publishing Company, Inc.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Mindfulness: A Proposed Operational Definition

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            Mechanisms of mindfulness.

            Recently, the psychological construct mindfulness has received a great deal of attention. The majority of research has focused on clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions. This line of research has led to promising data suggesting mindfulness-based interventions are effective for treatment of both psychological and physical symptoms. However, an equally important direction for future research is to investigate questions concerning mechanisms of action underlying mindfulness-based interventions. This theoretical paper proposes a model of mindfulness, in an effort to elucidate potential mechanisms to explain how mindfulness affects positive change. Potential implications and future directions for the empirical study of mechanisms involved in mindfulness are addressed. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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              Private self-consciousness and the five-factor model of personality: distinguishing rumination from reflection.

              A distinction between ruminative and reflective types of private self-attentiveness is introduced and evaluated with respect to L. R. Goldberg's (1982) list of 1,710 English trait adjectives (Study 1), the five-factor model of personality (FFM) and A. Fenigstein, M. F. Scheier, and A. Buss's (1975) Self-Consciousness Scales (Study 2), and previously reported correlates and effects of private self-consciousness (PrSC; Studies 3 and 4). Results suggest that the PrSC scale confounds two unrelated, motivationally distinct dispositions--rumination and reflection--and that this confounding may account for the "self-absorption paradox" implicit in PrSC research findings: Higher PrSC scores are associated with more accurate and extensive self-knowledge yet higher levels of psychological distress. The potential of the FFM to provide a comprehensive framework for conceptualizing self-attentive dispositions, and to order and integrate research findings within this domain, is discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Empirical Studies of the Arts
                Empirical Studies of the Arts
                Baywood Publishing Company, Inc.
                0276-2374
                1541-4493
                July 29 2011
                July 2011
                July 29 2011
                July 2011
                : 29
                : 2
                : 243-255
                Affiliations
                [1 ]North Dakota State University
                Article
                10.2190/EM.29.2.g
                © 2011

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