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      Family-centered Care in the NICU :

      The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing

      Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)

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          Most cited references 20

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          Correlates of lactation in mothers of very low birth weight infants.

          We sought to determine the correlates of intent to breastfeed and of successful lactation and nursing at the breast in mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW; or =5 times per day, and kangaroo care. These correlates remained significant after controlling for maternal age, race, marital status, and education beyond high school. At 4 months' CA, 14 mothers (16%) were still lactating, 12 of whom were nursing at the breast. Increased maternal support specifically directed toward behavioral factors, including early and more frequent milk expression and kangaroo care, may improve the rates of successful lactation among mothers of VLBW infants who choose to breastfeed.
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            'Chatting': an important clinical tool in facilitating mothering in neonatal nurseries.

            This paper explores the use of 'chat' or 'social talk' as an important clinical tool that can assist nurses achieve family-centred care in neonatal nurseries. The study was undertaken to increase knowledge of women's experiences of mothering in the neonatal nursery and the relationship they share with nurses. The discussion presented is elicited from a grounded theory analysis of over 60 hours of interview data with 28 women, a thematic analysis of 50 hours of interviews with 20 nurses and a content analysis of 398 tape-recorded interactions between nurses and parents. The analysis identifies the importance of the nurse-mother relationship and demonstrates that it is both the context and method by which nursing care is delivered. We found the verbal exchanges that take place between nurse and mother influence a woman's confidence, her sense of control and her feelings of connection to her infant. It appears from the data that the nurse's ability to effectively 'engage' the mother is dependent on the use of language that expresses care, support and interest in parents. The data suggests that 'chatting' is the strategy and the process through which positive interactions are initiated, maintained and enhanced. This study confirms that nurses' language acts as a powerful clinical tool that can be used to assist parents in gaining confidence in caring for their infants and in becoming 'connected' to infants resident in nurseries.
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              Mothers' stories about their experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit.

              The purpose of this article is to let mothers tell the stories of their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experiences and to determine how well these experiences fit the Preterm Parental Distress Model. Interviews were conducted with 31 mothers when their infants were six months of age corrected for prematurity and were analyzed using the conceptual model as a framework. The analysis verified the presence in the data of the six major sources of stress indicated in the Preterm Parental Distress Model: (1) pre-existing and concurrent personal and family factors, (2) prenatal and perinatal experiences, (3) infant illness, treatments, and appearance in the NICU, (4) concerns about the infant's outcomes, (5) loss of the parental role, and (6) health care providers. The study indicates that health care providers, and especially nurses, can have a major role in reducing parental distress by maintaining ongoing communication with parents and providing competent care for their infants.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
                The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0893-2190
                2006
                January 2006
                : 20
                : 1
                : 98-102
                Article
                10.1097/00005237-200601000-00029
                © 2006

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