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      Die Bedeutung der Gesundheitskommunikation in der Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung

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          Abstract

          Aufgrund technologischer Entwicklungen hat sich die Gesundheitskommunikation in den letzten Jahrzehnten grundlegend verändert – von einer eindimensionalen hin zu einer interaktiven und multidirektionalen Kommunikation. Das vorliegende Kapitel zielt darauf ab, die Bedeutung von Gesundheitskommunikation für Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung wie auch Potenziale und Herausforderungen neuer Entwicklungen darzustellen. Aus psychologischer Perspektive werden hierbei drei grundlegende Ziele unterschieden: die Darbietung von Informationen, die Wahrnehmungsveränderung sowie die Veränderung von Gesundheitsverhalten. Um gesundheitsrelevante Inhalte entsprechend dieser drei Ziele wirkungsvoll und zielgerichtet zu kommunizieren, werden unterschiedliche Darstellungsformate (z. B. visuell) und Verbreitungsmöglichkeiten (z. B. Smartphone-Apps) diskutiert und anhand von aktuellen Beispielen, wie dem Ausbruch der neuartigen Coronavirus-Erkrankung COVID-19, skizziert.

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          Most cited references 55

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                michael.tiemann@srh.de
                melvin.mohokum@srh.de
                luka-johanna.debbeler@uni-konstanz.de
                deborah.Wahl@uni-konstanz.de
                karoline.villinger@uni-konstanz.de
                britta.renner@uni-konstanz.de
                Journal
                978-3-662-62426-5
                10.1007/978-3-662-62426-5
                Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung
                Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung
                978-3-662-62425-8
                978-3-662-62426-5
                18 December 2020
                2021
                : 251-261
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Campus Leverkusen, SRH Hochschule für Gesundheit, Leverkusen, Germany
                [2 ]GRID grid.21051.37, ISNI 0000 0001 0601 6589, Fakultät Gesundheit, Sicherheit, Gesellschaft, , Hochschule Furtwangen, ; Furtwangen, Germany
                GRID grid.9811.1, ISNI 0000 0001 0658 7699, Universität Konstanz, ; Konstanz, Deutschland
                Article
                13
                10.1007/978-3-662-62426-5_13
                7985954
                © Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2021

                This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted research re-use and secondary analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic.

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                © Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2021

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