5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Memory complaints and risk of cognitive impairment after nearly 2 decades among older women

      , PhD, , PhD, , MD, MPH, , MD

      Neurology

      Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objectives:

          To investigate the association between subjective memory complaints (SMCs) and long-term risk of cognitive impairment in aging because most previous studies have followed individuals for only a few years.

          Methods:

          Participants were 1,107 cognitively normal, community-dwelling older women (aged 65 years and older at baseline) in a prospective study of aging. SMCs were assessed shortly after baseline and repeatedly over time with the yes/no question, “Do you feel you have more problems with memory than most?” Cognitive status 18 years later (normal or impaired with mild cognitive impairment or dementia) was determined by an expert panel. Using logistic regression, we investigated the association between SMCs over time and risk of cognitive impairment, adjusting for demographics, baseline cognition, and characteristics that differed between those with and without SMCs.

          Results:

          At baseline, 8.0% of participants (n = 89) endorsed SMCs. Baseline SMCs were associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment 18 years later (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8). Results were unchanged after excluding participants with depression. The association between SMCs and cognitive impairment was greatest at the last SMC assessment time point (18 years before diagnosis: adjusted OR = 1.7 [1.1–2.9]; 14 years before diagnosis: adjusted OR = 1.6 [0.9–2.7]; 10 years before diagnosis: adjusted OR = 1.9 [1.1–3.1]; 4 years before diagnosis: adjusted OR = 3.0 [1.8–5.0]).

          Conclusions:

          SMCs are associated with cognitive impairment nearly 2 decades later among older women. SMCs may be a very early symptom of an insidious neurodegenerative disease process, such as Alzheimer disease.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          Neurology
          Neurology
          neurology
          neur
          neurology
          NEUROLOGY
          Neurology
          Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (Hagerstown, MD )
          0028-3878
          1526-632X
          24 November 2015
          24 November 2016
          : 85
          : 21
          : 1852-1858
          Affiliations
          From Research Service (A.R.K.), San Francisco VA Medical Center (K.Y.); Departments of Psychiatry (A.R.K., J.N., K.Y.), Neurology (K.Y.), and Epidemiology and Biostatistics (K.Y.), University of California San Francisco; and Center for Health Research (E.S.L.), Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR.
          Author notes
          Correspondence to Dr. Kaup: allison.kaup@ 123456ucsf.edu

          Go to Neurology.org for full disclosures. Funding information and disclosures deemed relevant by the authors, if any, are provided at the end of the article.

          Article
          PMC4662698 PMC4662698 4662698 NEUROLOGY2015664110
          10.1212/WNL.0000000000002153
          4662698
          26511452
          © 2015 American Academy of Neurology
          Categories
          25
          36
          54
          59
          Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article

          Cited by 31