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      MRGBP as a potential biomarker for the malignancy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

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          Abstract

          MORF4-related gene-binding protein (MRGBP), which is also known as chromosome 20 open reading frame 20 (C20orf20), is commonly highly expressed in several types of malignant tumors and tumor progression. However, the expression pattern and underlying mechanism of MRGBP in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain unknown. In the study, we found that MRGBP was frequently upregulated in PDAC tissues and cell lines. In addition, the upregulation of MRGBP was positively associated with TNM stage, T classification, and poor prognosis. Knockdown of MRGBP in the PDAC cell lines ASPC-1 and Mia PaCa-2 by transiently transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) drastically attenuated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of those cells, whereas ectopic MRGBP overexpression in BxPC-3 cells produced exactly the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also found that overexpression of MRGBP remarkably led to cell morphological changes and induced an increased expression of mesenchymal marker Vimentin, whereas a decreased expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin. Taken together, this study indicates that MRGBP acts as a tumor oncogene in PDAC and is a promising target of carcinogenesis.

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          Most cited references 37

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                ImpactJ
                Oncotarget
                Impact Journals LLC
                1949-2553
                8 September 2017
                22 July 2017
                : 8
                : 38
                : 64224-64236
                Affiliations
                1 Department of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, ZhongNan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China
                2 The Hubei Clinical Center & Key Laboratory of Intestinal & Colorectal Diseases, Wuhan 430071, China
                3 Laboratory of Clinical Immunology, Wuhan No.1 Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
                4 Department of Pathology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430079, China
                5 Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Qiu Zhao, zhaoqiuwhu@ 123456sina.com
                Article
                19451
                10.18632/oncotarget.19451
                5609997
                Copyright: © 2017 Ding et al.

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY), which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Paper

                Oncology & Radiotherapy

                upregulation, mrgbp, biomarker, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

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