Blog
About

6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The quest for a non-vector psyllid: Natural variation in acquisition and transmission of the huanglongbing pathogen ‘ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ by Asian citrus psyllid isofemale lines

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Genetic variability in insect vectors is valuable to study vector competence determinants and to select non-vector populations that may help reduce the spread of vector-borne pathogens. We collected and tested vector competency of 15 isofemale lines of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, vector of ‘ Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ ( CLas). CLas is associated with huanglongbing (citrus greening), the most serious citrus disease worldwide. D. citri adults were collected from orange jasmine ( Murraya paniculata) hedges in Florida, and individual pairs (females and males) were caged on healthy Murraya plants for egg laying. The progeny from each pair that tested CLas-negative by qPCR were maintained on Murraya plants and considered an isofemale line. Six acquisition tests on D. citri adults that were reared as nymphs on CLas-infected citrus, from various generations of each line, were conducted to assess their acquisition rates (percentage of qPCR-positive adults). Three lines with mean acquisition rates of 28 to 32%, were classified as ‘good’ acquirers and three other lines were classified as ‘poor’ acquirers, with only 5 to 8% acquisition rates. All lines were further tested for their ability to inoculate CLas by confining CLas-exposed psyllids for one week onto healthy citrus leaves (6–10 adults/leaf/week), and testing the leaves for CLas by qPCR. Mean inoculation rates were 19 to 28% for the three good acquirer lines and 0 to 3% for the three poor acquirer lines. Statistical analyses indicated positive correlations between CLas acquisition and inoculation rates, as well as between CLas titer in the psyllids and CLas acquisition or inoculation rates. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of one of the good and one of the poor acquirer lines revealed differences between them in color morphs and hemocyanin expression, but not the composition of bacterial endosymbionts. Understanding the genetic architecture of CLas transmission will enable the development of new tools for combating this devastating citrus disease.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 75

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) Method.

          The two most commonly used methods to analyze data from real-time, quantitative PCR experiments are absolute quantification and relative quantification. Absolute quantification determines the input copy number, usually by relating the PCR signal to a standard curve. Relative quantification relates the PCR signal of the target transcript in a treatment group to that of another sample such as an untreated control. The 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method is a convenient way to analyze the relative changes in gene expression from real-time quantitative PCR experiments. The purpose of this report is to present the derivation, assumptions, and applications of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method. In addition, we present the derivation and applications of two variations of the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method that may be useful in the analysis of real-time, quantitative PCR data. Copyright 2001 Elsevier Science (USA).
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Current epidemiological understanding of citrus Huanglongbing .

            Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive citrus pathosystem worldwide. Previously known primarily from Asia and Africa, it was introduced into the Western Hemisphere in 2004. All infected commercial citrus industries continue to decline owing to inadequate current control methods. HLB increase and regional spatial spread, related to vector populations, are rapid compared with other arboreal pathosystems. Disease dynamics result from multiple simultaneous spatial processes, suggesting that psyllid vector transmission is a continuum from local area to very long distance. Evolutionarily, HLB appears to have originated as an insect endosymbiont that has moved into plants. Lack of exposure of citrus to the pathogen prior to approximately 100 years ago did not provide sufficient time for development of resistance. A prolonged incubation period and regional dispersal make eradication nonviable. Multiple asymptomatic infections per symptomatic tree, incomplete systemic distribution within trees, and prolonged incubation period make detection difficult and greatly complicate disease control.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Huanglongbing: a destructive newly-emerging century-old disease of citrus

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                13 April 2018
                2018
                : 13
                : 4
                Affiliations
                [1 ] USDA-ARS, US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, Florida, United States of America
                [2 ] University of Florida, Lake Alfred & Fort Pierce, Florida, United States of America
                [3 ] Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
                [4 ] USDA-ARS Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research Unit, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
                [5 ] Plant Pathology and Plant Microbe Biology Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America
                University of Saskatchewan College of Agriculture and Bioresources, CANADA
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-17-36416
                10.1371/journal.pone.0195804
                5898736
                29652934

                This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

                Page count
                Figures: 6, Tables: 6, Pages: 23
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100005825, National Institute of Food and Agriculture;
                Award ID: 2016-70016- 24779
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100005825, National Institute of Food and Agriculture;
                Award ID: 2016-70016- 24779
                Award Recipient : Michelle (Cilia) Heck
                Funded by: California Citrus Research Board
                Award ID: 5300-163B
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: California Citrus Research Board
                Award ID: 5300-163A
                Award Recipient : Michelle (Cilia) Heck
                Funded by: California Citrus Research Board
                Award ID: 5300-155A
                Award Recipient : Michelle (Cilia) Heck
                The authors received funding from California Citrus Research Board grants 5300-163, 5300-155, and USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant 2016-70016-24779. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Animals
                Invertebrates
                Arthropoda
                Insects
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Plant Science
                Plant Anatomy
                Leaves
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Plants
                Fruits
                Citrus
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Infectious Diseases
                Disease Vectors
                Insect Vectors
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Species Interactions
                Disease Vectors
                Insect Vectors
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Developmental Biology
                Life Cycles
                Nymphs
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Ecology
                Plant Ecology
                Plant-Animal Interactions
                Plant-Insect Interactions
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Ecology
                Plant Ecology
                Plant-Animal Interactions
                Plant-Insect Interactions
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Plant Science
                Plant Ecology
                Plant-Animal Interactions
                Plant-Insect Interactions
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Plants
                People and places
                Geographical locations
                North America
                United States
                Florida
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article